Workshop on HIV infection and aging

What is known and future research directions

Rita B. Effros, Courtney V Fletcher, Kelly Gebo, Jeffrey B. Halter, William R. Hazzard, Frances McFarland Horne, Robin E. Huebner, Edward N. Janoff, Amy C. Justice, Daniel Kuritzkes, Susan G. Nayfield, Susan F. Plaeger, Kenneth E. Schmader, John R. Ashworth, Christine Campanelli, Charles P. Clayton, Beth Rada, Nancy F. Woolard, Kevin P. High

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

382 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Highly active antiretroviral treatment has resulted in dramatically increased life expectancy among patients with HIV infection who are now aging while receiving treatment and are at risk of developing chronic diseases associated with advanced age. Similarities between aging and the courses of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome suggest that HIV infection compresses the aging process, perhaps accelerating comorbidities and frailty. In a workshop organized by the Association of Specialty Professors, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the HIV Medical Association, the National Institute on Aging, and the National Institute on Allergy and Infectious Diseases, researchers in infectious diseases, geriatrics, immunology, and gerontology met to review what is known about HIV infection and aging, to identify research gaps, and to suggest high priority topics for future research. Answers to the questions posed are likely to help prioritize and balance strategies to slow the progression of HIV infection, to address comorbidities and drug toxicity, and to enhance understanding about both HIV infection and aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)542-553
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2008

Fingerprint

Virus Diseases
HIV
Education
Geriatrics
Comorbidity
National Institute on Aging (U.S.)
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (U.S.)
Life Expectancy
Direction compound
Allergy and Immunology
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Communicable Diseases
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Chronic Disease
Research Personnel
Therapeutics
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Effros, R. B., Fletcher, C. V., Gebo, K., Halter, J. B., Hazzard, W. R., Horne, F. M., ... High, K. P. (2008). Workshop on HIV infection and aging: What is known and future research directions. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 47(4), 542-553. https://doi.org/10.1086/590150

Workshop on HIV infection and aging : What is known and future research directions. / Effros, Rita B.; Fletcher, Courtney V; Gebo, Kelly; Halter, Jeffrey B.; Hazzard, William R.; Horne, Frances McFarland; Huebner, Robin E.; Janoff, Edward N.; Justice, Amy C.; Kuritzkes, Daniel; Nayfield, Susan G.; Plaeger, Susan F.; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Ashworth, John R.; Campanelli, Christine; Clayton, Charles P.; Rada, Beth; Woolard, Nancy F.; High, Kevin P.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 47, No. 4, 15.08.2008, p. 542-553.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Effros, RB, Fletcher, CV, Gebo, K, Halter, JB, Hazzard, WR, Horne, FM, Huebner, RE, Janoff, EN, Justice, AC, Kuritzkes, D, Nayfield, SG, Plaeger, SF, Schmader, KE, Ashworth, JR, Campanelli, C, Clayton, CP, Rada, B, Woolard, NF & High, KP 2008, 'Workshop on HIV infection and aging: What is known and future research directions', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 47, no. 4, pp. 542-553. https://doi.org/10.1086/590150
Effros, Rita B. ; Fletcher, Courtney V ; Gebo, Kelly ; Halter, Jeffrey B. ; Hazzard, William R. ; Horne, Frances McFarland ; Huebner, Robin E. ; Janoff, Edward N. ; Justice, Amy C. ; Kuritzkes, Daniel ; Nayfield, Susan G. ; Plaeger, Susan F. ; Schmader, Kenneth E. ; Ashworth, John R. ; Campanelli, Christine ; Clayton, Charles P. ; Rada, Beth ; Woolard, Nancy F. ; High, Kevin P. / Workshop on HIV infection and aging : What is known and future research directions. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2008 ; Vol. 47, No. 4. pp. 542-553.
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