Workplace Faculty Friendships and Work-Family Culture

Megumi Watanabe, Christina Falci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although various work-family policies are available to faculty members, many underuse these policies due to concerns about negative career consequences. Therefore, we believe it is important to develop an academic work culture that is more supportive of work-family needs. Using network data gathered from faculty members at a Midwestern university, this study investigated the relationship between friendship connections with colleagues and perceived work-family supportiveness in the department. It also explored the role of parental status in the relationship for men and women. Results show that faculty with larger friendship networks have more positive perceptions of work-family culture compared to faculty with smaller friendship networks, for all faculty except women without children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-125
Number of pages13
JournalInnovative Higher Education
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

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family work
friendship
workplace
work culture
data network
family policy
career
university

Keywords

  • Faculty
  • Social Networks
  • Work-Family Culture
  • Work-Life Integration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Workplace Faculty Friendships and Work-Family Culture. / Watanabe, Megumi; Falci, Christina.

In: Innovative Higher Education, Vol. 42, No. 2, 01.04.2017, p. 113-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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