Workload comparison of IntraOral mask to standard mask ventilation using a cadaver model

Bernadette McCrory, Bethany R Lowndes, Darcy L. Thompson, Emily E. Miller, Jakeb D. Riggle, Michael Charles Wadman, M. Susan Hallbeck

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The bag-valve mask (BVM) is critical to providing positive pressure ventilation for patients who are not breathing or who are breathing inadequately. This simple hand-held device enables healthcare professionals to quickly provide mechanical ventilation in emergent and non-emergent situations. However, the difficulty of achieving and maintaining an adequate seal between the BVM and face reduces ventilation volume and the success rate of resuscitation efforts. A novel IntraOral Mask (IOM) was developed by NuMask to eliminate these difficulties by creating a seal inside the mouth using a snorkel-like mouthpiece. There have been no published reports comparing the human factors and ergonomics of these masks. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the perceived workload of the standard BVM and the NuMask IOM. Method: Twenty-five emergency medicine students performed mechanical ventilation on a cadaver model using both masks. Workload was assessed using the NASA-TLX after ventilating with each mask. Results: Overall workload and effort were rated significantly less for the IOM (p < 0.05). In general, the IOM had lower median ratings for physical demand, mental demand and frustration compared to the BVM. Conclusion: Overall, the IOM appears to facilitate gripping through its novel snorkel-like design and reduced hand interface size by decreasing the perceived effort and workload of the healthcare responder. However, further clinical and ergonomic investigations are needed to ascertain whether the IOM improves mechanical ventilation performance and therefore resuscitation success rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
Pages1728-1732
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
EventProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 22 2012Oct 26 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/22/1210/26/12

Fingerprint

workload
Ventilation
Masks
ergonomics
demand
frustration
Resuscitation
rating
medicine
Ergonomics
Seals
performance
student
Human engineering
Medicine
NASA
Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

McCrory, B., Lowndes, B. R., Thompson, D. L., Miller, E. E., Riggle, J. D., Wadman, M. C., & Hallbeck, M. S. (2012). Workload comparison of IntraOral mask to standard mask ventilation using a cadaver model. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 (pp. 1728-1732). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society). https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561346

Workload comparison of IntraOral mask to standard mask ventilation using a cadaver model. / McCrory, Bernadette; Lowndes, Bethany R; Thompson, Darcy L.; Miller, Emily E.; Riggle, Jakeb D.; Wadman, Michael Charles; Hallbeck, M. Susan.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. 2012. p. 1728-1732 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

McCrory, B, Lowndes, BR, Thompson, DL, Miller, EE, Riggle, JD, Wadman, MC & Hallbeck, MS 2012, Workload comparison of IntraOral mask to standard mask ventilation using a cadaver model. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, pp. 1728-1732, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012, Boston, MA, United States, 10/22/12. https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561346
McCrory B, Lowndes BR, Thompson DL, Miller EE, Riggle JD, Wadman MC et al. Workload comparison of IntraOral mask to standard mask ventilation using a cadaver model. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. 2012. p. 1728-1732. (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society). https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561346
McCrory, Bernadette ; Lowndes, Bethany R ; Thompson, Darcy L. ; Miller, Emily E. ; Riggle, Jakeb D. ; Wadman, Michael Charles ; Hallbeck, M. Susan. / Workload comparison of IntraOral mask to standard mask ventilation using a cadaver model. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. 2012. pp. 1728-1732 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).
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