Working memory

Timothy J. Ricker, Angela M. AuBuchon, Nelson Cowan

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The working memory system maintains the limited information that can be kept in mind at one time. Thesememories are distinct from the vast amount of information stored in long-termmemory. Herewegive a brief summary of findings over the past half-century in the areas of working memory that we see as particularly important for understanding its nature. We discuss several current controversies, including whether there are different systems or brain modules for different kinds of working memory, why we lose items from working memory, and how individuals and age groups differ. We try to describe what is and is not known. Last, a discussion of findings from neuroimaging helps to constrain working memory theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)573-585
Number of pages13
JournalWiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010

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Short-Term Memory
Neuroimaging
Age Groups
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Working memory. / Ricker, Timothy J.; AuBuchon, Angela M.; Cowan, Nelson.

In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science, Vol. 1, No. 4, 01.07.2010, p. 573-585.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ricker, Timothy J. ; AuBuchon, Angela M. ; Cowan, Nelson. / Working memory. In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science. 2010 ; Vol. 1, No. 4. pp. 573-585.
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