Workforce well-being: Personal and workplace contributions to early educators’ depression across settings

Amy M. Roberts, Kathleen C Gallagher, Alexandra M. Daro, Iheoma U. Iruka, Susan L. Sarver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Building on research demonstrating the importance of teachers’ well-being, this study examined personal and contextual factors related to early childhood educators’ (n = 1640) depressive symptoms across licensed child care homes, centers, and schools. Aspects of teachers’ beliefs, economic status, and work-related stress were explored, and components of each emerged as significant in an OLS regression. After controlling for demographics and setting, teachers with more adult-centered beliefs, lower wages, multiple jobs, no health insurance, more workplace demands, and fewer work-related resources, had more depressive symptoms. Adult-centered beliefs were more closely associated with depression for teachers working in home-based settings compared to center-based settings. These findings provide preliminary evidence about what relates to depression in the early childhood workforce, which has implications for supporting well-being across settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-12
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Volume61
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Workplace
Depression
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Health Insurance
Child Care
Economics
Demography
Research

Keywords

  • Child care
  • Depression
  • Early childhood educators
  • Mental health
  • Teachers
  • Well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Workforce well-being : Personal and workplace contributions to early educators’ depression across settings. / Roberts, Amy M.; Gallagher, Kathleen C; Daro, Alexandra M.; Iruka, Iheoma U.; Sarver, Susan L.

In: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, Vol. 61, 01.03.2019, p. 4-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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