Wideband acoustic transfer functions predict middle-ear effusion

John C. Ellison, Michael P Gorga, Edward Cohn, Denis Fitzpatrick, Chris A. Sanford, Douglas H Keefe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis: Compare the accuracy of wideband acoustic transfer functions (WATFs) measured in the ear canal at ambient pressure to methods currently recommended by clinical guidelines for predicting middle-ear effusion (MEE). Study Design: Cross-sectional validating diagnostic study among young children with and without MEE to investigate the ability of WATFs to predict MEE. Methods: WATF measures were obtained in an MEE group of 44 children (53 ears; median age, 1.3 years) scheduled for middle-ear ventilation tube placement and a normal age-matched control group of 44 children (59 ears; median age, 1.2 years) with normal pneumatic otoscopic findings and no history of ear disease or middle-ear surgery. An otolaryngologist judged whether MEE was present or absent and rated tympanic-membrane (TM) mobility via pneumatic otoscopy. A likelihood-ratio classifier reduced WATF data (absorbance, admittance magnitude and phase) from 0.25 to 8 kHz to a single predictor of MEE status. Absorbance was compared to pneumatic otoscopy classifications of TM mobility. Results: Absorbance was reduced in ears with MEE compared to ears from the control group. Absorbance and admittance magnitude were the best single WATF predictors of MEE, but a predictor combining absorbance, admittance magnitude, and phase was the most accurate. Absorbance varied systematically with TM mobility based on data from pneumatic otoscopy. Conclusions: Results showed that absorbance is sensitive to middle-ear stiffness and MEE, and WATF predictions of MEE in young children are as accurate as those reported for methods recommended by the clinical guidelines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)887-894
Number of pages8
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume122
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

Fingerprint

Otitis Media with Effusion
Acoustics
Otoscopy
Tympanic Membrane
Ear
Middle Ear
Guidelines
Middle Ear Ventilation
Ear Diseases
Control Groups
Ear Canal
Research Design
Cross-Sectional Studies
Pressure

Keywords

  • Absorbance
  • admittance
  • clinical decision theory
  • effusion
  • myringotomy
  • pneumatic otoscopy
  • receiver operating characteristic curve
  • tympanometry
  • wideband acoustic transfer functions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Wideband acoustic transfer functions predict middle-ear effusion. / Ellison, John C.; Gorga, Michael P; Cohn, Edward; Fitzpatrick, Denis; Sanford, Chris A.; Keefe, Douglas H.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 122, No. 4, 01.04.2012, p. 887-894.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ellison, JC, Gorga, MP, Cohn, E, Fitzpatrick, D, Sanford, CA & Keefe, DH 2012, 'Wideband acoustic transfer functions predict middle-ear effusion', Laryngoscope, vol. 122, no. 4, pp. 887-894. https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.23182
Ellison, John C. ; Gorga, Michael P ; Cohn, Edward ; Fitzpatrick, Denis ; Sanford, Chris A. ; Keefe, Douglas H. / Wideband acoustic transfer functions predict middle-ear effusion. In: Laryngoscope. 2012 ; Vol. 122, No. 4. pp. 887-894.
@article{b4899725032243d89bdbf3e4839cdff9,
title = "Wideband acoustic transfer functions predict middle-ear effusion",
abstract = "Objectives/Hypothesis: Compare the accuracy of wideband acoustic transfer functions (WATFs) measured in the ear canal at ambient pressure to methods currently recommended by clinical guidelines for predicting middle-ear effusion (MEE). Study Design: Cross-sectional validating diagnostic study among young children with and without MEE to investigate the ability of WATFs to predict MEE. Methods: WATF measures were obtained in an MEE group of 44 children (53 ears; median age, 1.3 years) scheduled for middle-ear ventilation tube placement and a normal age-matched control group of 44 children (59 ears; median age, 1.2 years) with normal pneumatic otoscopic findings and no history of ear disease or middle-ear surgery. An otolaryngologist judged whether MEE was present or absent and rated tympanic-membrane (TM) mobility via pneumatic otoscopy. A likelihood-ratio classifier reduced WATF data (absorbance, admittance magnitude and phase) from 0.25 to 8 kHz to a single predictor of MEE status. Absorbance was compared to pneumatic otoscopy classifications of TM mobility. Results: Absorbance was reduced in ears with MEE compared to ears from the control group. Absorbance and admittance magnitude were the best single WATF predictors of MEE, but a predictor combining absorbance, admittance magnitude, and phase was the most accurate. Absorbance varied systematically with TM mobility based on data from pneumatic otoscopy. Conclusions: Results showed that absorbance is sensitive to middle-ear stiffness and MEE, and WATF predictions of MEE in young children are as accurate as those reported for methods recommended by the clinical guidelines.",
keywords = "Absorbance, admittance, clinical decision theory, effusion, myringotomy, pneumatic otoscopy, receiver operating characteristic curve, tympanometry, wideband acoustic transfer functions",
author = "Ellison, {John C.} and Gorga, {Michael P} and Edward Cohn and Denis Fitzpatrick and Sanford, {Chris A.} and Keefe, {Douglas H}",
year = "2012",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/lary.23182",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "122",
pages = "887--894",
journal = "Laryngoscope",
issn = "0023-852X",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Wideband acoustic transfer functions predict middle-ear effusion

AU - Ellison, John C.

AU - Gorga, Michael P

AU - Cohn, Edward

AU - Fitzpatrick, Denis

AU - Sanford, Chris A.

AU - Keefe, Douglas H

PY - 2012/4/1

Y1 - 2012/4/1

N2 - Objectives/Hypothesis: Compare the accuracy of wideband acoustic transfer functions (WATFs) measured in the ear canal at ambient pressure to methods currently recommended by clinical guidelines for predicting middle-ear effusion (MEE). Study Design: Cross-sectional validating diagnostic study among young children with and without MEE to investigate the ability of WATFs to predict MEE. Methods: WATF measures were obtained in an MEE group of 44 children (53 ears; median age, 1.3 years) scheduled for middle-ear ventilation tube placement and a normal age-matched control group of 44 children (59 ears; median age, 1.2 years) with normal pneumatic otoscopic findings and no history of ear disease or middle-ear surgery. An otolaryngologist judged whether MEE was present or absent and rated tympanic-membrane (TM) mobility via pneumatic otoscopy. A likelihood-ratio classifier reduced WATF data (absorbance, admittance magnitude and phase) from 0.25 to 8 kHz to a single predictor of MEE status. Absorbance was compared to pneumatic otoscopy classifications of TM mobility. Results: Absorbance was reduced in ears with MEE compared to ears from the control group. Absorbance and admittance magnitude were the best single WATF predictors of MEE, but a predictor combining absorbance, admittance magnitude, and phase was the most accurate. Absorbance varied systematically with TM mobility based on data from pneumatic otoscopy. Conclusions: Results showed that absorbance is sensitive to middle-ear stiffness and MEE, and WATF predictions of MEE in young children are as accurate as those reported for methods recommended by the clinical guidelines.

AB - Objectives/Hypothesis: Compare the accuracy of wideband acoustic transfer functions (WATFs) measured in the ear canal at ambient pressure to methods currently recommended by clinical guidelines for predicting middle-ear effusion (MEE). Study Design: Cross-sectional validating diagnostic study among young children with and without MEE to investigate the ability of WATFs to predict MEE. Methods: WATF measures were obtained in an MEE group of 44 children (53 ears; median age, 1.3 years) scheduled for middle-ear ventilation tube placement and a normal age-matched control group of 44 children (59 ears; median age, 1.2 years) with normal pneumatic otoscopic findings and no history of ear disease or middle-ear surgery. An otolaryngologist judged whether MEE was present or absent and rated tympanic-membrane (TM) mobility via pneumatic otoscopy. A likelihood-ratio classifier reduced WATF data (absorbance, admittance magnitude and phase) from 0.25 to 8 kHz to a single predictor of MEE status. Absorbance was compared to pneumatic otoscopy classifications of TM mobility. Results: Absorbance was reduced in ears with MEE compared to ears from the control group. Absorbance and admittance magnitude were the best single WATF predictors of MEE, but a predictor combining absorbance, admittance magnitude, and phase was the most accurate. Absorbance varied systematically with TM mobility based on data from pneumatic otoscopy. Conclusions: Results showed that absorbance is sensitive to middle-ear stiffness and MEE, and WATF predictions of MEE in young children are as accurate as those reported for methods recommended by the clinical guidelines.

KW - Absorbance

KW - admittance

KW - clinical decision theory

KW - effusion

KW - myringotomy

KW - pneumatic otoscopy

KW - receiver operating characteristic curve

KW - tympanometry

KW - wideband acoustic transfer functions

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84858751528&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84858751528&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/lary.23182

DO - 10.1002/lary.23182

M3 - Article

C2 - 22374909

AN - SCOPUS:84858751528

VL - 122

SP - 887

EP - 894

JO - Laryngoscope

JF - Laryngoscope

SN - 0023-852X

IS - 4

ER -