Why we don't come

Patient perceptions on no-shows

Naomi L. Lacy, Audrey Paulman, Matthew D. Reuter, Bruce Lovejoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

182 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Patients who schedule clinic appointments and fail to keep them have a negative impact on the workflow of a clinic in many ways. This study was conducted to identify the reasons patients in an urban family practice setting give for not keeping scheduled appointments. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 34 adult patients coming to the clinic for outpatient care. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. A multidisciplinary team used an immersion-crystallization organizing style to analyze the content of the qualitative interviews individually and in team meetings. RESULTS: Participants identified 3 types of issues related to missing appointments without notifying the clinic staff: emotions, perceived disrespect, and not understanding the scheduling system. Although they discussed logistical issues of appointment keeping, participants did not identify these issues as key reasons for nonattendance. Appointment making among these participants was driven by immediate symptoms and a desire for self-care. At the same time, many of these participants experienced anticipatory fear and anxiety about both procedures and bad news. Participants did not feel obligated to keep a scheduled appointment in part because they felt disrespected by the health care system. The effect of this feeling was compounded by participants' lack of understanding of the scheduling system. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that reducing no-show rates among patients who sometimes attend might be addressed by reviewing waiting times and participants' perspectives of personal respect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)541-545
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of family medicine
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2004

Fingerprint

Appointments and Schedules
Interviews
Emotions
Workflow
Family Practice
Immersion
Ambulatory Care
Self Care
Crystallization
Fear
Anxiety
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Attendance
  • Family practice
  • Office visits, no-shows
  • Patient compliance
  • Patient satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Why we don't come : Patient perceptions on no-shows. / Lacy, Naomi L.; Paulman, Audrey; Reuter, Matthew D.; Lovejoy, Bruce.

In: Annals of family medicine, Vol. 2, No. 6, 01.11.2004, p. 541-545.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lacy, Naomi L. ; Paulman, Audrey ; Reuter, Matthew D. ; Lovejoy, Bruce. / Why we don't come : Patient perceptions on no-shows. In: Annals of family medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 2, No. 6. pp. 541-545.
@article{9361094244ab4903bfdf4ed6a813a3b0,
title = "Why we don't come: Patient perceptions on no-shows",
abstract = "PURPOSE: Patients who schedule clinic appointments and fail to keep them have a negative impact on the workflow of a clinic in many ways. This study was conducted to identify the reasons patients in an urban family practice setting give for not keeping scheduled appointments. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 34 adult patients coming to the clinic for outpatient care. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. A multidisciplinary team used an immersion-crystallization organizing style to analyze the content of the qualitative interviews individually and in team meetings. RESULTS: Participants identified 3 types of issues related to missing appointments without notifying the clinic staff: emotions, perceived disrespect, and not understanding the scheduling system. Although they discussed logistical issues of appointment keeping, participants did not identify these issues as key reasons for nonattendance. Appointment making among these participants was driven by immediate symptoms and a desire for self-care. At the same time, many of these participants experienced anticipatory fear and anxiety about both procedures and bad news. Participants did not feel obligated to keep a scheduled appointment in part because they felt disrespected by the health care system. The effect of this feeling was compounded by participants' lack of understanding of the scheduling system. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that reducing no-show rates among patients who sometimes attend might be addressed by reviewing waiting times and participants' perspectives of personal respect.",
keywords = "Attendance, Family practice, Office visits, no-shows, Patient compliance, Patient satisfaction",
author = "Lacy, {Naomi L.} and Audrey Paulman and Reuter, {Matthew D.} and Bruce Lovejoy",
year = "2004",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1370/afm.123",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "541--545",
journal = "Annals of Family Medicine",
issn = "1544-1709",
publisher = "Annals of Family Medicine, Inc",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Why we don't come

T2 - Patient perceptions on no-shows

AU - Lacy, Naomi L.

AU - Paulman, Audrey

AU - Reuter, Matthew D.

AU - Lovejoy, Bruce

PY - 2004/11/1

Y1 - 2004/11/1

N2 - PURPOSE: Patients who schedule clinic appointments and fail to keep them have a negative impact on the workflow of a clinic in many ways. This study was conducted to identify the reasons patients in an urban family practice setting give for not keeping scheduled appointments. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 34 adult patients coming to the clinic for outpatient care. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. A multidisciplinary team used an immersion-crystallization organizing style to analyze the content of the qualitative interviews individually and in team meetings. RESULTS: Participants identified 3 types of issues related to missing appointments without notifying the clinic staff: emotions, perceived disrespect, and not understanding the scheduling system. Although they discussed logistical issues of appointment keeping, participants did not identify these issues as key reasons for nonattendance. Appointment making among these participants was driven by immediate symptoms and a desire for self-care. At the same time, many of these participants experienced anticipatory fear and anxiety about both procedures and bad news. Participants did not feel obligated to keep a scheduled appointment in part because they felt disrespected by the health care system. The effect of this feeling was compounded by participants' lack of understanding of the scheduling system. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that reducing no-show rates among patients who sometimes attend might be addressed by reviewing waiting times and participants' perspectives of personal respect.

AB - PURPOSE: Patients who schedule clinic appointments and fail to keep them have a negative impact on the workflow of a clinic in many ways. This study was conducted to identify the reasons patients in an urban family practice setting give for not keeping scheduled appointments. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 34 adult patients coming to the clinic for outpatient care. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. A multidisciplinary team used an immersion-crystallization organizing style to analyze the content of the qualitative interviews individually and in team meetings. RESULTS: Participants identified 3 types of issues related to missing appointments without notifying the clinic staff: emotions, perceived disrespect, and not understanding the scheduling system. Although they discussed logistical issues of appointment keeping, participants did not identify these issues as key reasons for nonattendance. Appointment making among these participants was driven by immediate symptoms and a desire for self-care. At the same time, many of these participants experienced anticipatory fear and anxiety about both procedures and bad news. Participants did not feel obligated to keep a scheduled appointment in part because they felt disrespected by the health care system. The effect of this feeling was compounded by participants' lack of understanding of the scheduling system. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that reducing no-show rates among patients who sometimes attend might be addressed by reviewing waiting times and participants' perspectives of personal respect.

KW - Attendance

KW - Family practice

KW - Office visits, no-shows

KW - Patient compliance

KW - Patient satisfaction

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=10444284930&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=10444284930&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1370/afm.123

DO - 10.1370/afm.123

M3 - Article

VL - 2

SP - 541

EP - 545

JO - Annals of Family Medicine

JF - Annals of Family Medicine

SN - 1544-1709

IS - 6

ER -