Why ISIS’s message resonates: Leveraging Islam, sociopolitical catalysts, and adaptive messaging

Ian R. Pelletier, Leif Lundmark, Rachel Gardner, Gina Scott Ligon, Ramazan Kilinc

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How does the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) leverage Islamic Law to support their strategic objectives? Islam, as most religions, is a defining catalyst of group identity. ISIS has capitalized on this, using it as a vehicle to legitimize its interpretation of Islamic Law. This study builds on Social Movement Theory to develop and test a conceptual framework of ISIS messaging strategies. This framework highlights the progression of the organization’s message from mainstream Islamic Law to radical unified reinterpretation. ISIS leaders’ speeches are used to test the model. Ultimately, study findings inform countermessaging strategies and identify mobilization mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)871-899
Number of pages29
JournalStudies in Conflict and Terrorism
Volume39
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2016

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Syria
Iraq
Islam
Catalysts
Law
social movement
mobilization
Religion
leader
interpretation
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Safety Research
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Why ISIS’s message resonates : Leveraging Islam, sociopolitical catalysts, and adaptive messaging. / Pelletier, Ian R.; Lundmark, Leif; Gardner, Rachel; Ligon, Gina Scott; Kilinc, Ramazan.

In: Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, Vol. 39, No. 10, 02.10.2016, p. 871-899.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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