Why Is Diabetic Bile Lithogenic?

Stephen Rennard

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Abstract

To the Editor: In the recent report by Bennion and Grundy entitled “Effects of Diabetes Mellitus on Cholesterol Metabolism in Man” (N Engl J Med 296:1365–1371, 1977), the authors offer several speculative explanations for the seemingly paradoxical observation that diabetic bile appears to be less lithogenic when treatment of hyperglycemia is inadequate. Another explanation that could relate hyperglycemia to gallstones might be considered. The authors studied their patients at “steady-state” conditions. If hyperglycemia precedes increased cholesterol synthesis and hyperlipoproteinemia, which in turn precede increased production of bile salts, there might be a period after a rise in blood glucose level. . . No extract is available for articles shorter than 400 words.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-560
Number of pages2
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume297
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 8 1977

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Bile
Hyperglycemia
Cholesterol
Hyperlipoproteinemias
Gallstones
Bile Acids and Salts
Blood Glucose
Diabetes Mellitus
Observation
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Why Is Diabetic Bile Lithogenic? / Rennard, Stephen.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 297, No. 10, 08.09.1977, p. 559-560.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Rennard, Stephen. / Why Is Diabetic Bile Lithogenic?. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1977 ; Vol. 297, No. 10. pp. 559-560.
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