Why hybrid males are sterile in Drosophila?

Paras Kumar Mishra, Bashisth N. Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hybrid male sterility is one of the most rapidly evolving postzygotic reproductive barriers, which has received special attention in the study of speciation. In Drosophila, in majority of interspecific crosses, hybrid males are sterile while females are fertile. Why hybrid males are sterile remains a fundamental question for evolutionary biologists. A number of investigations have been carried out to understand the causes of hybrid male sterility and the results suggest that it may involve either X-Y, X-autosomes, Y-autosomes, cytoplasmic incompatibilities or a number of genes. The genetic basis of hybrid sterility remains nebulous, but it seems that it involves a large number of genes and almost all chromosomes. The only characterized speciation gene in Drosophila today is Odysseus, but no functional tests yet have been reported that support its role in hybrid sterility and its functional equivalence to the homeobox gene. To understand the mechanism of hybrid male sterility, several theories have been proposed. The three most important theories are dominance theory, fastermale theory and faster-X theory, among which the dominance theory is the most popular. Although studies on hybrid male sterility in Drosophila are well documented, no conclusive mechanism of sterility that is uniformly obeyed in all species is still known. During last two decades, the resurgence of interest in hybrid male sterility and the use of Drosophila as a model organism for such study warrant a comprehensive review on this topic to facilitate better understanding of this subject. In view of this, a brief history as well as the recent advances in the field of hybrid male sterility in Drosophila are documented in the present article.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1813-1819
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Science
Volume89
Issue number11
StatePublished - Dec 10 2005

Fingerprint

Drosophila
Male Infertility
male fertility
Infertility
autosomes
dominance (genetics)
Genes
cytoplasmic incompatibility
homeotic genes
genes
Homeobox Genes
biologists
Chromosomes
History
chromosomes
history
organisms

Keywords

  • Drosophila
  • Genetic interactions
  • Hybrid male sterility
  • Odysseus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Why hybrid males are sterile in Drosophila? / Mishra, Paras Kumar; Singh, Bashisth N.

In: Current Science, Vol. 89, No. 11, 10.12.2005, p. 1813-1819.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Mishra, PK & Singh, BN 2005, 'Why hybrid males are sterile in Drosophila?', Current Science, vol. 89, no. 11, pp. 1813-1819.
Mishra, Paras Kumar ; Singh, Bashisth N. / Why hybrid males are sterile in Drosophila?. In: Current Science. 2005 ; Vol. 89, No. 11. pp. 1813-1819.
@article{892462095ba54a719f3d9370eaaaa0b1,
title = "Why hybrid males are sterile in Drosophila?",
abstract = "Hybrid male sterility is one of the most rapidly evolving postzygotic reproductive barriers, which has received special attention in the study of speciation. In Drosophila, in majority of interspecific crosses, hybrid males are sterile while females are fertile. Why hybrid males are sterile remains a fundamental question for evolutionary biologists. A number of investigations have been carried out to understand the causes of hybrid male sterility and the results suggest that it may involve either X-Y, X-autosomes, Y-autosomes, cytoplasmic incompatibilities or a number of genes. The genetic basis of hybrid sterility remains nebulous, but it seems that it involves a large number of genes and almost all chromosomes. The only characterized speciation gene in Drosophila today is Odysseus, but no functional tests yet have been reported that support its role in hybrid sterility and its functional equivalence to the homeobox gene. To understand the mechanism of hybrid male sterility, several theories have been proposed. The three most important theories are dominance theory, fastermale theory and faster-X theory, among which the dominance theory is the most popular. Although studies on hybrid male sterility in Drosophila are well documented, no conclusive mechanism of sterility that is uniformly obeyed in all species is still known. During last two decades, the resurgence of interest in hybrid male sterility and the use of Drosophila as a model organism for such study warrant a comprehensive review on this topic to facilitate better understanding of this subject. In view of this, a brief history as well as the recent advances in the field of hybrid male sterility in Drosophila are documented in the present article.",
keywords = "Drosophila, Genetic interactions, Hybrid male sterility, Odysseus",
author = "Mishra, {Paras Kumar} and Singh, {Bashisth N.}",
year = "2005",
month = "12",
day = "10",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "89",
pages = "1813--1819",
journal = "Current Science",
issn = "0011-3891",
publisher = "Indian Academy of Sciences",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Why hybrid males are sterile in Drosophila?

AU - Mishra, Paras Kumar

AU - Singh, Bashisth N.

PY - 2005/12/10

Y1 - 2005/12/10

N2 - Hybrid male sterility is one of the most rapidly evolving postzygotic reproductive barriers, which has received special attention in the study of speciation. In Drosophila, in majority of interspecific crosses, hybrid males are sterile while females are fertile. Why hybrid males are sterile remains a fundamental question for evolutionary biologists. A number of investigations have been carried out to understand the causes of hybrid male sterility and the results suggest that it may involve either X-Y, X-autosomes, Y-autosomes, cytoplasmic incompatibilities or a number of genes. The genetic basis of hybrid sterility remains nebulous, but it seems that it involves a large number of genes and almost all chromosomes. The only characterized speciation gene in Drosophila today is Odysseus, but no functional tests yet have been reported that support its role in hybrid sterility and its functional equivalence to the homeobox gene. To understand the mechanism of hybrid male sterility, several theories have been proposed. The three most important theories are dominance theory, fastermale theory and faster-X theory, among which the dominance theory is the most popular. Although studies on hybrid male sterility in Drosophila are well documented, no conclusive mechanism of sterility that is uniformly obeyed in all species is still known. During last two decades, the resurgence of interest in hybrid male sterility and the use of Drosophila as a model organism for such study warrant a comprehensive review on this topic to facilitate better understanding of this subject. In view of this, a brief history as well as the recent advances in the field of hybrid male sterility in Drosophila are documented in the present article.

AB - Hybrid male sterility is one of the most rapidly evolving postzygotic reproductive barriers, which has received special attention in the study of speciation. In Drosophila, in majority of interspecific crosses, hybrid males are sterile while females are fertile. Why hybrid males are sterile remains a fundamental question for evolutionary biologists. A number of investigations have been carried out to understand the causes of hybrid male sterility and the results suggest that it may involve either X-Y, X-autosomes, Y-autosomes, cytoplasmic incompatibilities or a number of genes. The genetic basis of hybrid sterility remains nebulous, but it seems that it involves a large number of genes and almost all chromosomes. The only characterized speciation gene in Drosophila today is Odysseus, but no functional tests yet have been reported that support its role in hybrid sterility and its functional equivalence to the homeobox gene. To understand the mechanism of hybrid male sterility, several theories have been proposed. The three most important theories are dominance theory, fastermale theory and faster-X theory, among which the dominance theory is the most popular. Although studies on hybrid male sterility in Drosophila are well documented, no conclusive mechanism of sterility that is uniformly obeyed in all species is still known. During last two decades, the resurgence of interest in hybrid male sterility and the use of Drosophila as a model organism for such study warrant a comprehensive review on this topic to facilitate better understanding of this subject. In view of this, a brief history as well as the recent advances in the field of hybrid male sterility in Drosophila are documented in the present article.

KW - Drosophila

KW - Genetic interactions

KW - Hybrid male sterility

KW - Odysseus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=31644436892&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=31644436892&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

VL - 89

SP - 1813

EP - 1819

JO - Current Science

JF - Current Science

SN - 0011-3891

IS - 11

ER -