Who are you? we really wanna know. especially if you think you're like a computer scientist

Rob Semmens, Chris Piech, Michelle Friend

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We developed a short, easily implemented survey that measures the similarity in phrases describing the self and a computer scientist. Additionally, we took initial steps in determining adjectives or phrases that describe a stereotypical computer scientist. We then administered this survey before and after an eight-week summer computer science program for high school girls. We found that phrases or adjectives used to describe the self converged with those to describe the computer scientist. In addition, descriptions of both were more positive at the end of the program compared to the beginning. Finally, the stereotypical of a computer scientist decreased from the beginning to the end of the program. Future work includes refinement of the stereotype measure and assessing different types of computer science programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGenderIT 2015 Advancing Diversity - Conference Proceedings
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages40-43
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781450335966
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 24 2015
Event3rd Conference on Advancing Diversity, GenderIT 2015 - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: Apr 24 2015Apr 25 2015

Publication series

NameACM International Conference Proceeding Series
Volume24-25-April-2015

Other

Other3rd Conference on Advancing Diversity, GenderIT 2015
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period4/24/154/25/15

Fingerprint

Computer science

Keywords

  • Education
  • Identity
  • Machine Learning
  • Stereotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Semmens, R., Piech, C., & Friend, M. (2015). Who are you? we really wanna know. especially if you think you're like a computer scientist. In GenderIT 2015 Advancing Diversity - Conference Proceedings (pp. 40-43). (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series; Vol. 24-25-April-2015). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/2807565.2807711

Who are you? we really wanna know. especially if you think you're like a computer scientist. / Semmens, Rob; Piech, Chris; Friend, Michelle.

GenderIT 2015 Advancing Diversity - Conference Proceedings. Association for Computing Machinery, 2015. p. 40-43 (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series; Vol. 24-25-April-2015).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Semmens, R, Piech, C & Friend, M 2015, Who are you? we really wanna know. especially if you think you're like a computer scientist. in GenderIT 2015 Advancing Diversity - Conference Proceedings. ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, vol. 24-25-April-2015, Association for Computing Machinery, pp. 40-43, 3rd Conference on Advancing Diversity, GenderIT 2015, Philadelphia, United States, 4/24/15. https://doi.org/10.1145/2807565.2807711
Semmens R, Piech C, Friend M. Who are you? we really wanna know. especially if you think you're like a computer scientist. In GenderIT 2015 Advancing Diversity - Conference Proceedings. Association for Computing Machinery. 2015. p. 40-43. (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series). https://doi.org/10.1145/2807565.2807711
Semmens, Rob ; Piech, Chris ; Friend, Michelle. / Who are you? we really wanna know. especially if you think you're like a computer scientist. GenderIT 2015 Advancing Diversity - Conference Proceedings. Association for Computing Machinery, 2015. pp. 40-43 (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series).
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