Wet cross-linking gliadin fibers with citric acid and a quantitative relationship between cross-linking conditions and mechanical properties

Narendra Reddy, Ying Li, Yiqi Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports the wet cross-linking of gliadin fibers using citric acid without using phosphorus-containing catalysts or high temperatures. Carboxylic acids such as citric acid are inexpensive and nontoxic chemicals preferred for cross-linking proteins and cellulose. However, previous studies have shown that carboxylic acid cross-linked materials experience substantial strength loss and/or yellowing when cross-linked using phosphorus-containing catalysts after drying and curing at high temperatures. In this research, citric acid has been used to cross-link gliadin fibers and the effects of various cross-linking conditions on the breaking tenacity and breaking elongation have been studied. A mathematical relationship that can predict the breaking tenacity of the fibers at various cross-linking conditions has also been developed. This research shows that citric acid in aqueous solutions can cross-link gliadin fibers at low temperatures using alkali as catalyst. The method of cross-linking developed in this research could be useful to cross-link plant proteins for food, fiber, and other applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-98
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 14 2009

Fingerprint

Gliadin
gliadin
crosslinking
Citric Acid
citric acid
mechanical properties
dietary fiber
Mechanical properties
catalysts
Fibers
Carboxylic Acids
Tenacity
Phosphorus
Temperature
carboxylic acids
Research
Catalysts
Plant Proteins
curing (food products)
Alkalies

Keywords

  • Breaking tenacity
  • Catalysts
  • Citric acid
  • Cross-linking
  • Gliadin
  • Protein fibers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "This paper reports the wet cross-linking of gliadin fibers using citric acid without using phosphorus-containing catalysts or high temperatures. Carboxylic acids such as citric acid are inexpensive and nontoxic chemicals preferred for cross-linking proteins and cellulose. However, previous studies have shown that carboxylic acid cross-linked materials experience substantial strength loss and/or yellowing when cross-linked using phosphorus-containing catalysts after drying and curing at high temperatures. In this research, citric acid has been used to cross-link gliadin fibers and the effects of various cross-linking conditions on the breaking tenacity and breaking elongation have been studied. A mathematical relationship that can predict the breaking tenacity of the fibers at various cross-linking conditions has also been developed. This research shows that citric acid in aqueous solutions can cross-link gliadin fibers at low temperatures using alkali as catalyst. The method of cross-linking developed in this research could be useful to cross-link plant proteins for food, fiber, and other applications.",
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AU - Reddy, Narendra

AU - Li, Ying

AU - Yang, Yiqi

PY - 2009/1/14

Y1 - 2009/1/14

N2 - This paper reports the wet cross-linking of gliadin fibers using citric acid without using phosphorus-containing catalysts or high temperatures. Carboxylic acids such as citric acid are inexpensive and nontoxic chemicals preferred for cross-linking proteins and cellulose. However, previous studies have shown that carboxylic acid cross-linked materials experience substantial strength loss and/or yellowing when cross-linked using phosphorus-containing catalysts after drying and curing at high temperatures. In this research, citric acid has been used to cross-link gliadin fibers and the effects of various cross-linking conditions on the breaking tenacity and breaking elongation have been studied. A mathematical relationship that can predict the breaking tenacity of the fibers at various cross-linking conditions has also been developed. This research shows that citric acid in aqueous solutions can cross-link gliadin fibers at low temperatures using alkali as catalyst. The method of cross-linking developed in this research could be useful to cross-link plant proteins for food, fiber, and other applications.

AB - This paper reports the wet cross-linking of gliadin fibers using citric acid without using phosphorus-containing catalysts or high temperatures. Carboxylic acids such as citric acid are inexpensive and nontoxic chemicals preferred for cross-linking proteins and cellulose. However, previous studies have shown that carboxylic acid cross-linked materials experience substantial strength loss and/or yellowing when cross-linked using phosphorus-containing catalysts after drying and curing at high temperatures. In this research, citric acid has been used to cross-link gliadin fibers and the effects of various cross-linking conditions on the breaking tenacity and breaking elongation have been studied. A mathematical relationship that can predict the breaking tenacity of the fibers at various cross-linking conditions has also been developed. This research shows that citric acid in aqueous solutions can cross-link gliadin fibers at low temperatures using alkali as catalyst. The method of cross-linking developed in this research could be useful to cross-link plant proteins for food, fiber, and other applications.

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KW - Cross-linking

KW - Gliadin

KW - Protein fibers

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