We Wear Suits and Lie to Each Other

Charity H Evans, Lisa L Schlitzkus, Valerie Shostrom, Kimberly D Schenarts

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective The residency match process is stressful and costly for fourth-year medical students with significant personal and professional implications. We hypothesize that students use impression management (IM) tactics such as conforming to the perceived expectations of program directors and interviewers and to improve their chances of matching. Design After institutional review board approval, a piloted survey tool was administered to fourth-year medical students at 17 schools. Questions were divided into interviewing behavior categories—slight image creation (embellishing and tailoring), extensive image creation (constructing, inventing, and borrowing), image protection (omitting), and ingratiation (opinion conforming). Descriptive statistics are presented as percentages. Data were analyzed using chi-square test, Fischer exact test, and Bonferroni-adjusted p values where appropriate with statistical significance set at p < 0.05. Setting Allopathic medical schools in the United States. Participants Fourth-year medical students in the United States. Results The response rate was 21.3%. Respondents were equally male (49.7%)/female (50.3%), primarily 25 to 27-year old (65.9%) and located in the midwest (78.8%). Most attended public medical schools (73.1%). Statistically significant findings are presented in the Tables. Conclusions Fourth-year medical students feel the need, and in some instances, actually engage in IM tactics. This study demonstrates that IM tactics are used, and vary by interviewee characteristics. Program directors’ awareness of IM tactics may help improving the quality of residency interviews and therefore select more suitable candidates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e158-e168
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
Volume73
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

Medical Students
tactics
medical student
Internship and Residency
Medical Schools
management
director
Interviews
school
Research Ethics Committees
statistical significance
Chi-Square Distribution
interview
descriptive statistics
candidacy
Students
student
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Interpersonal and Communication Skills
  • Professionalism
  • impression management
  • medical students
  • residency interviews
  • residency match

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Education

Cite this

We Wear Suits and Lie to Each Other. / Evans, Charity H; Schlitzkus, Lisa L; Shostrom, Valerie; Schenarts, Kimberly D.

In: Journal of Surgical Education, Vol. 73, No. 6, 01.11.2016, p. e158-e168.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Evans, Charity H ; Schlitzkus, Lisa L ; Shostrom, Valerie ; Schenarts, Kimberly D. / We Wear Suits and Lie to Each Other. In: Journal of Surgical Education. 2016 ; Vol. 73, No. 6. pp. e158-e168.
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