Way-finding and landmarks: The multiple-bearings hypothesis

A. C. Kamil, K. Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) are capable of very precise searching using the metric relationships between a goal and multiple landmarks to relocate the goal location. They can judge the direction more accurately than the distance to a landmark when the landmark is distant from the goal. On the basis of these findings, we propose that nutcrackers use a set of bearings, each a measure of the direction from the goal to a different landmark, when searching for that goal. The results of a simulation demonstrate that increasing the number of landmarks used results in increasingly precise searching. This multiple-bearings hypothesis makes a series of detailed predictions about how the distribution of searches will vary as a function of the geometry of the locations of the relevant landmarks and the goal. It also suggests an explanation for inconsistencies in the literature on the effects of clock-shifts on searching and on homing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-113
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Experimental Biology
Volume204
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 10 2001

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geometry
prediction
simulation
distribution
effect
Direction compound

Keywords

  • Clark's nutcracker
  • Landmark
  • Navigation
  • Nucifraga columbiana
  • Way-finding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Physiology
  • Aquatic Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Insect Science

Cite this

Way-finding and landmarks : The multiple-bearings hypothesis. / Kamil, A. C.; Cheng, K.

In: Journal of Experimental Biology, Vol. 204, No. 1, 10.02.2001, p. 103-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kamil, AC & Cheng, K 2001, 'Way-finding and landmarks: The multiple-bearings hypothesis', Journal of Experimental Biology, vol. 204, no. 1, pp. 103-113.
Kamil, A. C. ; Cheng, K. / Way-finding and landmarks : The multiple-bearings hypothesis. In: Journal of Experimental Biology. 2001 ; Vol. 204, No. 1. pp. 103-113.
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