Water-gas shift reaction catalyzed by redox enzymes on conducting graphite platelets

Oliver Lazarus, Thomas W. Woolerton, Alison Parkin, Michael J. Lukey, Erwin Reisner, Javier Seravalli, Elizabeth Pierce, Stephen W. Ragsdale, Frank Sargent, Fraser A. Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

(Chemical Equation Presented) The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (CO + H2O CO2 + H2) is of major industrial significance in the production of H2 from hydrocarbon sources. High temperatures are required, typically in excess of 200°C, using d-metal catalysts on oxide supports. In our study the WGS process is separated into two half-cell electrochemical reactions (H+ reduction and CO oxidation), catalyzed by enzymes attached to a conducting particle. The H + reduction reaction is catalyzed by a hydrogenase, Hyd-2, from Escherichia coli, and CO oxidation is catalyzed by a carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH I) from Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans. This results in a highly efficient heterogeneous catalyst with a turnover frequency, at 30°C, of at least 2.5 s-1 per minimum functional unit (a CODH/Hyd-2 pair) which is comparable to conventional high-temperature catalysts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14154-14155
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume131
Issue number40
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 14 2009

Fingerprint

Water gas shift
Graphite
Carbon Monoxide
Platelets
Oxidation-Reduction
Blood Platelets
Enzymes
Gases
carbon monoxide dehydrogenase
Catalysts
Water
Hydrogenase
Oxidation
Temperature
Electrochemical cells
Hydrocarbons
Catalyst supports
Carbon monoxide
Oxides
Escherichia coli

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Lazarus, O., Woolerton, T. W., Parkin, A., Lukey, M. J., Reisner, E., Seravalli, J., ... Armstrong, F. A. (2009). Water-gas shift reaction catalyzed by redox enzymes on conducting graphite platelets. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 131(40), 14154-14155. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja905797w

Water-gas shift reaction catalyzed by redox enzymes on conducting graphite platelets. / Lazarus, Oliver; Woolerton, Thomas W.; Parkin, Alison; Lukey, Michael J.; Reisner, Erwin; Seravalli, Javier; Pierce, Elizabeth; Ragsdale, Stephen W.; Sargent, Frank; Armstrong, Fraser A.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 131, No. 40, 14.10.2009, p. 14154-14155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lazarus, O, Woolerton, TW, Parkin, A, Lukey, MJ, Reisner, E, Seravalli, J, Pierce, E, Ragsdale, SW, Sargent, F & Armstrong, FA 2009, 'Water-gas shift reaction catalyzed by redox enzymes on conducting graphite platelets', Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 131, no. 40, pp. 14154-14155. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja905797w
Lazarus, Oliver ; Woolerton, Thomas W. ; Parkin, Alison ; Lukey, Michael J. ; Reisner, Erwin ; Seravalli, Javier ; Pierce, Elizabeth ; Ragsdale, Stephen W. ; Sargent, Frank ; Armstrong, Fraser A. / Water-gas shift reaction catalyzed by redox enzymes on conducting graphite platelets. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2009 ; Vol. 131, No. 40. pp. 14154-14155.
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