Walking a High Beam

The Balance Between Employment Stability, Workplace Flexibility, and Nonresident Father Involvement

Jason T. Castillo, Greg W Welch, Christian M. Sarver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Compared with resident fathers, nonresident fathers are more likely to be unemployed or underemployed and less likely, when they are employed, to have access to flexible work arrangements. Although lack of employment stability is associated with lower levels of father involvement, some research shows that increased stability at work without increased flexibility is negatively related to involvement. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 895), the authors examined the relationship between nonresident fathers' employment stability, workplace flexibility, and father involvement. Results indicate that workplace flexibility, but not employment stability, is associated with higher levels of involvement. Policy and practice implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-131
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Men's Health
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

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Keywords

  • employment
  • father involvement
  • nonresident fathers
  • workplace flexibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Walking a High Beam : The Balance Between Employment Stability, Workplace Flexibility, and Nonresident Father Involvement. / Castillo, Jason T.; Welch, Greg W; Sarver, Christian M.

In: American Journal of Men's Health, Vol. 6, No. 2, 01.03.2012, p. 120-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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