Vocal economy in vocally trained actresses and untrained female subjects

Suely Master, Marco Guzman, Jayme Dowdall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Vocally trained actresses are expected to have more vocal economy than nonactresses. Therefore, we hypothesize that there will be differences in the electroglottogram-based voice economy parameter quasi-output cost ratio (QOCR) between actresses and nonactresses. This difference should remain across different levels of intensity. Methods: A total of 30 actresses and 30 nonactresses were recruited for this study. Participants from both groups were required to sustain the vowels /a/, /i/, and /u/, in habitual, moderate, and high intensity levels. Acoustic variables such as sound pressure level (SPL), fundamental frequency (F0), and glottal contact quotient (CQ) were obtained. The QOCR was then calculated. Results: There were no significant differences among the groups for QOCR. Positive correlations were observed for QOCR versus SPL and QOCR versus F0 in all intensity levels. Negative correlation was found between QOCR and CQ in all intensity levels. Considering the differences among intensity levels, from habitual to moderate and from moderate to loud, only the CQ did not differ significantly. The QOCR, SPL, and F0 presented significant differences throughout the different intensity levels. Conclusion: The QOCR did not reflect the level of vocal training when comparing trained and nontrained female subjects in the present study. Both groups demonstrated more vocal economy in moderate and high intensity levels owing to more voice output without an increase in glottal adduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)698-704
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Voice
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

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Costs and Cost Analysis
Pressure
Acoustics

Keywords

  • Actors
  • Contact quotient
  • Impact stress
  • Vocal economy
  • Vocal loading

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

Cite this

Vocal economy in vocally trained actresses and untrained female subjects. / Master, Suely; Guzman, Marco; Dowdall, Jayme.

In: Journal of Voice, Vol. 27, No. 6, 01.11.2013, p. 698-704.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Master, Suely ; Guzman, Marco ; Dowdall, Jayme. / Vocal economy in vocally trained actresses and untrained female subjects. In: Journal of Voice. 2013 ; Vol. 27, No. 6. pp. 698-704.
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