Vitamin D Supplementation Practices in Breastfed Infants in Outpatient Pediatric Clinics

Megan Saathoff, Corrine K Hanson, Ann L Anderson Berry, Elizabeth Lyden, Cristina Fernandez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics increased the daily recommendation from 200 to 400 IU per day of vitamin D for all infants. Therefore, it has become vital for pediatricians and other healthcare providers to recommend and verify that their patients are on vitamin D supplementation. Objective. To investigate the proportion of pediatricians recommending vitamin D at the first and 6-month visit in infants and to determine predictors of vitamin D supplementation practices. Methods. Retrospective chart review of 219 patients seen at well baby pediatric visits to document the vitamin D supplementation practices. The Wilcoxon rank sum test and Fisher's exact test were used to make comparisons of weight, gestational age, gender, breastfeeding status, and insurance status based on vitamin D practices. Results. Eighty-seven percent of exclusively breastfed infants had no pediatrician recommendations for supplemental vitamin D at the first pediatrician visit, and 71% had no recommendations for vitamin D supplementation at the 6-month visit. There were no statistically significant data suggesting that vitamin D practices vary based on a patient's gestational age, weight, gender, or insurance. Conclusion. Compliance with the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation to provide 400 IU per day of vitamin D to infants is very low.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-126
Number of pages5
JournalInfant, Child, and Adolescent Nutrition
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2014

Fingerprint

Ambulatory Care Facilities
vitamin D
Vitamin D
Pediatrics
pediatricians
gestational age
insurance
Nonparametric Statistics
Gestational Age
Weights and Measures
Insurance Coverage
gender
breast feeding
infants
Insurance
Breast Feeding
Health Personnel
compliance
health services
testing

Keywords

  • breastfeeding
  • infants
  • vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Vitamin D Supplementation Practices in Breastfed Infants in Outpatient Pediatric Clinics. / Saathoff, Megan; Hanson, Corrine K; Anderson Berry, Ann L; Lyden, Elizabeth; Fernandez, Cristina.

In: Infant, Child, and Adolescent Nutrition, Vol. 6, No. 2, 01.04.2014, p. 122-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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