Visual and electrical evoked response recorded from subdural electrodes implanted above the visual cortex in normal dogs under two methods of anesthesia

E. Margalit, J. D. Weiland, R. E. Clatterbuck, G. Y. Fujii, M. Maia, M. Tameesh, G. Torres, S. A. D'Anna, S. Desai, D. V. Piyathaisere, A. Olivi, E. De Juan, Mark S. Humayun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sensitive methods are required to record electrical evoked potentials over the visual cortex to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a retinal prosthesis before it can be implanted on the retinal surface of patients afflicted by outer retinal diseases. This study was designed to examine subdural electrodes as a mean to evaluate cortical evoked potentials in response to light and electrical stimulation of the retina in three dogs under two methods of anesthesia-halothane and propofol. Results showed that subdural electrodes could be stabilized over the visual cortex for several (3-5) months, and that they were 6.95 times more sensitive than subdermal electrodes in recording cortical visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and 4.31 times more sensitive in recording cortical electrical evoked potentials under both methods of anesthesia. The waveforms' shape changed for each electrode in the subdural array during 6/6 (100%) and 20/38 (52%) multi-channel recording sessions under halothane and propofol, respectively. This change could point to a cortical retinotopic organization versus hierarchical organization of different cortical areas for a given retinal stimulus. In summary, subdural electrodes show promising results for recording visual and electrical evoked responses (EERs) and thus for evaluation of the retinal prosthesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-137
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume123
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2003

Fingerprint

Implanted Electrodes
Visual Evoked Potentials
Visual Cortex
Electrodes
Anesthesia
Dogs
Visual Prosthesis
Evoked Potentials
Propofol
Halothane
Retinal Diseases
Electric Stimulation
Retina
Safety
Light

Keywords

  • Artificial vision
  • Electrical evoked response
  • Electrical stimulation
  • Macular degeneration
  • Retinal prosthesis
  • Retinitis pigmentosa
  • Visual cortex
  • Visual evoked potential
  • Visual prosthesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Visual and electrical evoked response recorded from subdural electrodes implanted above the visual cortex in normal dogs under two methods of anesthesia. / Margalit, E.; Weiland, J. D.; Clatterbuck, R. E.; Fujii, G. Y.; Maia, M.; Tameesh, M.; Torres, G.; D'Anna, S. A.; Desai, S.; Piyathaisere, D. V.; Olivi, A.; De Juan, E.; Humayun, Mark S.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Vol. 123, No. 2, 15.03.2003, p. 129-137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Margalit, E, Weiland, JD, Clatterbuck, RE, Fujii, GY, Maia, M, Tameesh, M, Torres, G, D'Anna, SA, Desai, S, Piyathaisere, DV, Olivi, A, De Juan, E & Humayun, MS 2003, 'Visual and electrical evoked response recorded from subdural electrodes implanted above the visual cortex in normal dogs under two methods of anesthesia', Journal of Neuroscience Methods, vol. 123, no. 2, pp. 129-137. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0165-0270(02)00345-X
Margalit, E. ; Weiland, J. D. ; Clatterbuck, R. E. ; Fujii, G. Y. ; Maia, M. ; Tameesh, M. ; Torres, G. ; D'Anna, S. A. ; Desai, S. ; Piyathaisere, D. V. ; Olivi, A. ; De Juan, E. ; Humayun, Mark S. / Visual and electrical evoked response recorded from subdural electrodes implanted above the visual cortex in normal dogs under two methods of anesthesia. In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods. 2003 ; Vol. 123, No. 2. pp. 129-137.
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