Abstract

Current research in virology is changing public conceptions about vaccines and infectious disease. The University of Nebraska State Museum collaborated with research virologists, science writers, artists and learning researchers to create public outreach materials about viruses and infectious disease. The project, funded by the National Institute of Health’s SEPA program, developed comics, a book with Carl Zimmer, and other materials and programs. The project launched three kinds of learning research: 1) a survey of Nebraska adults on their opinions about vaccines and infectious disease; 2) a study comparing the mental models of viruses, vaccines, and infection from virologists, teachers, and students; and 3) a controlled study of 873 high school students randomly assigned to read either a comic or a text-based essay with the same virus information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-16
Number of pages8
JournalMuseums and Social Issues
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

contagious disease
learning
artist
museum
student
writer
teacher
science
school
Vaccine
Virus
Infectious Diseases
Virology
Outreach
Infection
Controlled
Artist
High School Students
Mental Models
Writer

Keywords

  • Comics
  • Microbes
  • Museum
  • Outreach
  • Vaccine
  • Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Museology
  • Cultural Studies

Cite this

Viruses, vaccines and the public. / Diamond, Judy; McQuillan, Julia; Spiegel, Amy N; Wonch Hill, Patricia A; Smith, Rebecca; West, John T; Wood, Charles.

In: Museums and Social Issues, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 9-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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