Vicarious Experience to Affect Physical Activity in Working Women: A Randomized Control Trial

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

People compare themselves to others for self-evaluation, practical information, and motivation for healthy behaviors. The effect of active peer models on comparative thinking is unknown. The purpose of this 12-week, randomized, two-group pilot study was to evaluate the effect of a workplace peer modeling intervention on self-efficacy, motivation, and comparative thinking. The attention control group (ACG; n = 24) received general health information. The intervention group (n = 26) met with active peer models, received an exercise prescription and information. No significant group by time interaction effects were found. Comparisons on ability (how well am I doing), opinions (what should I think or believe), future self (think about my future), and modeling (be like someone else) all increased in the intervention group (n = 21) but decreased in the ACG (n = 22). Active peer models may support physical activity behavior change through specific lines of comparative thinking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWestern journal of nursing research
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Working Women
Motivation
Exercise
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Aptitude
Ego
Self Efficacy
Workplace
Prescriptions
Control Groups
Health
Thinking

Keywords

  • peer modeling
  • physical activity
  • social comparison
  • vicarious experience
  • workplace

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

@article{1c84557cae9847759b401d8a6321a12e,
title = "Vicarious Experience to Affect Physical Activity in Working Women: A Randomized Control Trial",
abstract = "People compare themselves to others for self-evaluation, practical information, and motivation for healthy behaviors. The effect of active peer models on comparative thinking is unknown. The purpose of this 12-week, randomized, two-group pilot study was to evaluate the effect of a workplace peer modeling intervention on self-efficacy, motivation, and comparative thinking. The attention control group (ACG; n = 24) received general health information. The intervention group (n = 26) met with active peer models, received an exercise prescription and information. No significant group by time interaction effects were found. Comparisons on ability (how well am I doing), opinions (what should I think or believe), future self (think about my future), and modeling (be like someone else) all increased in the intervention group (n = 21) but decreased in the ACG (n = 22). Active peer models may support physical activity behavior change through specific lines of comparative thinking.",
keywords = "peer modeling, physical activity, social comparison, vicarious experience, workplace",
author = "Rowland, {Sheri A.} and Cohen, {Marlene Z.} and Pullen, {Carol H.} and Schulz, {Paula S.} and Berg, {Kris E.} and Kupzyk, {Kevin A.} and Pozehl, {Bunny J.} and Yates, {Bernice C.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0193945919856575",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Western Journal of Nursing Research",
issn = "0193-9459",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vicarious Experience to Affect Physical Activity in Working Women

T2 - A Randomized Control Trial

AU - Rowland, Sheri A.

AU - Cohen, Marlene Z.

AU - Pullen, Carol H.

AU - Schulz, Paula S.

AU - Berg, Kris E.

AU - Kupzyk, Kevin A.

AU - Pozehl, Bunny J.

AU - Yates, Bernice C.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - People compare themselves to others for self-evaluation, practical information, and motivation for healthy behaviors. The effect of active peer models on comparative thinking is unknown. The purpose of this 12-week, randomized, two-group pilot study was to evaluate the effect of a workplace peer modeling intervention on self-efficacy, motivation, and comparative thinking. The attention control group (ACG; n = 24) received general health information. The intervention group (n = 26) met with active peer models, received an exercise prescription and information. No significant group by time interaction effects were found. Comparisons on ability (how well am I doing), opinions (what should I think or believe), future self (think about my future), and modeling (be like someone else) all increased in the intervention group (n = 21) but decreased in the ACG (n = 22). Active peer models may support physical activity behavior change through specific lines of comparative thinking.

AB - People compare themselves to others for self-evaluation, practical information, and motivation for healthy behaviors. The effect of active peer models on comparative thinking is unknown. The purpose of this 12-week, randomized, two-group pilot study was to evaluate the effect of a workplace peer modeling intervention on self-efficacy, motivation, and comparative thinking. The attention control group (ACG; n = 24) received general health information. The intervention group (n = 26) met with active peer models, received an exercise prescription and information. No significant group by time interaction effects were found. Comparisons on ability (how well am I doing), opinions (what should I think or believe), future self (think about my future), and modeling (be like someone else) all increased in the intervention group (n = 21) but decreased in the ACG (n = 22). Active peer models may support physical activity behavior change through specific lines of comparative thinking.

KW - peer modeling

KW - physical activity

KW - social comparison

KW - vicarious experience

KW - workplace

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068006367&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85068006367&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0193945919856575

DO - 10.1177/0193945919856575

M3 - Article

C2 - 31204610

AN - SCOPUS:85068006367

JO - Western Journal of Nursing Research

JF - Western Journal of Nursing Research

SN - 0193-9459

ER -