Varying the speed of perceived self-motion affects postural control during locomotion

Josh Pickhinke, Jung Hung Chien, Mukul Mukherjee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Virtual reality environments have been used to show the importance of perception of self-motion in controlling posture and gait. In this study, the authors used a virtual reality environment to investigate whether varying optical flow speed had any effect on postural control during locomotion. Healthy young adult participants walked under two conditions, with optical flow matching their preferred walking speed, and with a randomly varying optic flow speed compared to their preferred walking speed. Exposure to the varying optic flow increased the variability in their postural control as measured by area of COP when compared with the matched speed condition. If perception of self-motion becomes less predictable, postural control during locomotion becomes more variable and possibly riskier.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedicine Meets Virtual Reality 21, NextMed/MMVR 2014
PublisherIOS Press
Pages319-324
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9781614993742
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Event21st Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference, NextMed/MMVR 2014 - Manhattan Beach, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 20 2014Feb 22 2014

Publication series

NameStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Volume196
ISSN (Print)0926-9630
ISSN (Electronic)1879-8365

Conference

Conference21st Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference, NextMed/MMVR 2014
CountryUnited States
CityManhattan Beach, CA
Period2/20/142/22/14

Fingerprint

Optic Flow
Motion Perception
Locomotion
Posture
Gait
Optical flows
Young Adult
Virtual reality
Optics
Walking Speed

Keywords

  • Virtual reality
  • center-of-pressure
  • optical flow
  • postural control
  • variability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Pickhinke, J., Chien, J. H., & Mukherjee, M. (2014). Varying the speed of perceived self-motion affects postural control during locomotion. In Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 21, NextMed/MMVR 2014 (pp. 319-324). (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics; Vol. 196). IOS Press. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-375-9-319

Varying the speed of perceived self-motion affects postural control during locomotion. / Pickhinke, Josh; Chien, Jung Hung; Mukherjee, Mukul.

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 21, NextMed/MMVR 2014. IOS Press, 2014. p. 319-324 (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics; Vol. 196).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Pickhinke, J, Chien, JH & Mukherjee, M 2014, Varying the speed of perceived self-motion affects postural control during locomotion. in Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 21, NextMed/MMVR 2014. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, vol. 196, IOS Press, pp. 319-324, 21st Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference, NextMed/MMVR 2014, Manhattan Beach, CA, United States, 2/20/14. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-375-9-319
Pickhinke J, Chien JH, Mukherjee M. Varying the speed of perceived self-motion affects postural control during locomotion. In Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 21, NextMed/MMVR 2014. IOS Press. 2014. p. 319-324. (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics). https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-375-9-319
Pickhinke, Josh ; Chien, Jung Hung ; Mukherjee, Mukul. / Varying the speed of perceived self-motion affects postural control during locomotion. Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 21, NextMed/MMVR 2014. IOS Press, 2014. pp. 319-324 (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics).
@inproceedings{daf3a7ecbbe840cbb2e519f159908fec,
title = "Varying the speed of perceived self-motion affects postural control during locomotion",
abstract = "Virtual reality environments have been used to show the importance of perception of self-motion in controlling posture and gait. In this study, the authors used a virtual reality environment to investigate whether varying optical flow speed had any effect on postural control during locomotion. Healthy young adult participants walked under two conditions, with optical flow matching their preferred walking speed, and with a randomly varying optic flow speed compared to their preferred walking speed. Exposure to the varying optic flow increased the variability in their postural control as measured by area of COP when compared with the matched speed condition. If perception of self-motion becomes less predictable, postural control during locomotion becomes more variable and possibly riskier.",
keywords = "Virtual reality, center-of-pressure, optical flow, postural control, variability",
author = "Josh Pickhinke and Chien, {Jung Hung} and Mukul Mukherjee",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3233/978-1-61499-375-9-319",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781614993742",
series = "Studies in Health Technology and Informatics",
publisher = "IOS Press",
pages = "319--324",
booktitle = "Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 21, NextMed/MMVR 2014",
address = "Netherlands",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Varying the speed of perceived self-motion affects postural control during locomotion

AU - Pickhinke, Josh

AU - Chien, Jung Hung

AU - Mukherjee, Mukul

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Virtual reality environments have been used to show the importance of perception of self-motion in controlling posture and gait. In this study, the authors used a virtual reality environment to investigate whether varying optical flow speed had any effect on postural control during locomotion. Healthy young adult participants walked under two conditions, with optical flow matching their preferred walking speed, and with a randomly varying optic flow speed compared to their preferred walking speed. Exposure to the varying optic flow increased the variability in their postural control as measured by area of COP when compared with the matched speed condition. If perception of self-motion becomes less predictable, postural control during locomotion becomes more variable and possibly riskier.

AB - Virtual reality environments have been used to show the importance of perception of self-motion in controlling posture and gait. In this study, the authors used a virtual reality environment to investigate whether varying optical flow speed had any effect on postural control during locomotion. Healthy young adult participants walked under two conditions, with optical flow matching their preferred walking speed, and with a randomly varying optic flow speed compared to their preferred walking speed. Exposure to the varying optic flow increased the variability in their postural control as measured by area of COP when compared with the matched speed condition. If perception of self-motion becomes less predictable, postural control during locomotion becomes more variable and possibly riskier.

KW - Virtual reality

KW - center-of-pressure

KW - optical flow

KW - postural control

KW - variability

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84897769166&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84897769166&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3233/978-1-61499-375-9-319

DO - 10.3233/978-1-61499-375-9-319

M3 - Conference contribution

C2 - 24732530

AN - SCOPUS:84897769166

SN - 9781614993742

T3 - Studies in Health Technology and Informatics

SP - 319

EP - 324

BT - Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 21, NextMed/MMVR 2014

PB - IOS Press

ER -