Valsalva's maneuver revisited

A quantitative method yielding insights into human autonomie control

Michael L. Smith, Larry A. Beightol, Janice M. Fritsch-Yelle, Kenneth A. Ellenbogen, Thomas Richard Porter, Dwain L. Eckberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Seventeen healthy supine subjects performed graded Valsalva maneuvers. In four subjects, transesophageal echographic aortic cross-sectional areas decreased during and increased after straining. During the first seconds of straining, when aortic cross-sectional area was declining and peripheral arterial pressure was rising, peroneal sympathetic muscle neurons were nearly silent. Then, as aortic cross-sectional area and peripheral pressure both declined, sympathetic muscle nerve activity increased, in proportion to the intensity of straining. Poststraining arterial pressure elevations were proportional to preceding increases of sympathetic activity. Sympathetic inhibition after straining persisted much longer than arterial and right atrial pressure elevations. Similarly, R-R intervals changed in parallel with peripheral arterial pressure, until -45 s after the onset of straining, when R-R intervals were greater and arterial pressures were smaller than prestraining levels. Our conclusions are as follows: opposing changes of carotid and aortic baroreceptor inputs reduce sympathetic muscle and increase vagal cardiac motor neuronal firing; parallel changes of barosensory inputs provoke reciprocal changes of sympathetic and direct changes of vagal firing; and pressure transients lasting only seconds reset arterial pressure-sympathetic and -vagal response relations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology
Volume271
Issue number3 PART 2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996

Fingerprint

Valsalva Maneuver
Arterial Pressure
Muscles
Pressure
Pressoreceptors
Atrial Pressure
Healthy Volunteers
Neurons

Keywords

  • Arterial pressure
  • Baroreceptors
  • Baroreflex resetting
  • Microneurography
  • Sympathetic
  • Vagal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Smith, M. L., Beightol, L. A., Fritsch-Yelle, J. M., Ellenbogen, K. A., Porter, T. R., & Eckberg, D. L. (1996). Valsalva's maneuver revisited: A quantitative method yielding insights into human autonomie control. American Journal of Physiology, 271(3 PART 2).

Valsalva's maneuver revisited : A quantitative method yielding insights into human autonomie control. / Smith, Michael L.; Beightol, Larry A.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.; Porter, Thomas Richard; Eckberg, Dwain L.

In: American Journal of Physiology, Vol. 271, No. 3 PART 2, 01.12.1996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, ML, Beightol, LA, Fritsch-Yelle, JM, Ellenbogen, KA, Porter, TR & Eckberg, DL 1996, 'Valsalva's maneuver revisited: A quantitative method yielding insights into human autonomie control', American Journal of Physiology, vol. 271, no. 3 PART 2.
Smith ML, Beightol LA, Fritsch-Yelle JM, Ellenbogen KA, Porter TR, Eckberg DL. Valsalva's maneuver revisited: A quantitative method yielding insights into human autonomie control. American Journal of Physiology. 1996 Dec 1;271(3 PART 2).
Smith, Michael L. ; Beightol, Larry A. ; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M. ; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A. ; Porter, Thomas Richard ; Eckberg, Dwain L. / Valsalva's maneuver revisited : A quantitative method yielding insights into human autonomie control. In: American Journal of Physiology. 1996 ; Vol. 271, No. 3 PART 2.
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