Validity of a questionnaire developed to measure the impact of a high-fidelity simulation intervention

A feasibility study

Kristine Haddeland, Åshild Slettebø, Elisabeth Svensson, Patricia K Carstens, Mariann Fossum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the validity and responsiveness of a questionnaire developed to measure the impact of a high-fidelity simulation intervention. Design: A pre- and postintervention design. Methods: In August 2017, 107 participants completed a questionnaire measuring knowledge and perceived self-confidence pre- and postintervention. Validity of the questionnaire was determined by expert reviews, individual interviews and estimates of the changes in knowledge and perceived self-confidence. The changes were estimated by the differences between paired proportions of participants. The responsiveness of the ordered categorical item scores on self-confidence was evaluated by the measure of systematic group change and individual variations. Results: The analysis of the interviews resulted in three themes: item content, item style and the administration of the questionnaire. An intervention effect on knowledge assessments was shown by the changes in paired proportions of participants with increased or decreased correct assessments (ranging from −25.5 - 24.8 percentage units). The responsiveness of the self-confidence scale was confirmed by evidence of post-intervention systematic group changes towards higher levels. Conclusion: This study provides useful experience for a forthcoming randomized controlled study to evaluate the effect of high-fidelity simulation on undergraduate nursing students’ knowledge and self-confidence when assessing patient deterioration. Impact: Cause-and-effect relationship between simulation and learning is required to improve nursing education. A statistically significant rise in students’ knowledge and levels of self-confidence after simulation were identified in this study. The study provided important aspects of future research study designs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of advanced nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Feasibility Studies
Interviews
Nursing Students
Nursing Education
Research Design
Learning
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • deteriorating patients
  • feasibility study
  • high-fidelity simulation
  • nursing students’ knowledge
  • nursing students’ self-confidence
  • ordinal data
  • questionnaire

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Validity of a questionnaire developed to measure the impact of a high-fidelity simulation intervention : A feasibility study. / Haddeland, Kristine; Slettebø, Åshild; Svensson, Elisabeth; Carstens, Patricia K; Fossum, Mariann.

In: Journal of advanced nursing, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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