Uterine Progesterone Receptor: Stabilization and Physicochemical Alterations Produced by Sodium Molybdate

Tong J. Chen, Richard G. MacDonald, Wendell W. Leavitt

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Abstract

Incubation of hamster uterine cytosol with millimolar concentrations of sodium molybdate prior to addition of labeled steroid increased recovery of progesterone receptor 2-fold. This stabilizing effect of molybdate was also manifest on gel electrophoresis of the receptor. In the absence of molybdate, no specific [3H] progesterone binding was detectable on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. But, in the presence of 5 mM sodium molybdate, a [3H]progesteronebinding species was clearly evident on the gels. The radioactivity associated with this binder was displaceable by unlabeled progesterone but not by cortisol and depended on the concentration of [3H]progesterone employed, suggesting that this binding species is a progesterone receptor. Molybdate treatment produced a small increase in receptor size on low-salt sucrose gradients (from 6-7 S to 7.5 S). There was no effect of molybdate on receptor sedimentation in the presence of high salt (0.3 M KC1). Further analysis of this phenomenon by gel filtration suggested that this molybdate-mediated increase in receptor size was due to receptor aggregation. In low-salt buffers, molybdate treatment markedly increased the proportion of receptors contained in large aggregates (Stokes radius >8.0 nm). Again, this effect was abolished in the presence of high salt. In conjunction with receptor stabilization, molybdate prevented binding of uterine progesterone receptor to DNA-cellulose. These findings suggest that sodium molybdate stabilizes the unliganded, unactivated form of the receptor. Moreover, these effects seem to be mediated through a direct interaction of molybdate with the receptor, one which results in receptor aggregation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3405-3411
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemistry
Volume20
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1981

Fingerprint

Progesterone Receptors
Stabilization
Salts
Receptor Aggregation
Progesterone
Gels
Electrophoresis
Agglomeration
sodium molybdate(VI)
molybdate
Radioactivity
Sedimentation
Cricetinae
Cytosol
Binders
Gel Chromatography
Sucrose
Hydrocortisone
Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis
Buffers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Uterine Progesterone Receptor : Stabilization and Physicochemical Alterations Produced by Sodium Molybdate. / Chen, Tong J.; MacDonald, Richard G.; Leavitt, Wendell W.

In: Biochemistry, Vol. 20, No. 12, 06.1981, p. 3405-3411.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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