Using PACS and wavelet-based image compression in a wide-area-network to support radiation therapy imaging applications for satellite hospitals

Charles L. Smith, Wei Kom Chu, Randy Wobig, Hongyang Chao, Charles Arthur Enke

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

An ongoing PACS project at our facility has been expanded to include providing and managing images used for routine clinical operation of the department of radiation oncology. The intent of our investigation has been to enable our clinical radiotherapy service to enter the tele-medicine environment through the use of a PACS system initially implemented in the department of radiology. The backbone for the imaging network includes five CT and three MR scanners located across three imaging centers. A PC workstation in the department of radiation oncology was used to transmit CT images to a satellite facility located approximately 60 miles from the primary center. Chest CT images were used to analyze network transmission performance. Connectivity established between the primary department and satellite has fulfilled all image criteria required by the oncologist. Establishing the link to the oncologist at the satellite diminished bottlenecking of imaging related tasks at the primary facility due to physician absence. A 30:1 compression ratio using a wavelet-based algorithm provided clinically acceptable images treatment planning. Clinical radiotherapy images can be effectively managed in a wide-area-network to link satellite facilities to larger clinical centers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherSociety of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers
Pages215-224
Number of pages10
Volume3662
StatePublished - 1999
EventProceedings of the 1999 Medical Imaging - PACS Design and Evaluation Engineering and Clinical Issues - San Diego, CA, USA
Duration: Jan 23 1999Jan 25 1999

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1999 Medical Imaging - PACS Design and Evaluation Engineering and Clinical Issues
CitySan Diego, CA, USA
Period1/23/991/25/99

Fingerprint

wide area networks
Picture archiving and communication systems
Wide area networks
Radiotherapy
Image compression
radiation therapy
Satellites
Imaging techniques
Oncology
Radiation
Satellite links
Telemedicine
Radiology
Electric power transmission networks
telemedicine
physicians
radiology
compression ratio
chest
workstations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Smith, C. L., Chu, W. K., Wobig, R., Chao, H., & Enke, C. A. (1999). Using PACS and wavelet-based image compression in a wide-area-network to support radiation therapy imaging applications for satellite hospitals. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 3662, pp. 215-224). Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

Using PACS and wavelet-based image compression in a wide-area-network to support radiation therapy imaging applications for satellite hospitals. / Smith, Charles L.; Chu, Wei Kom; Wobig, Randy; Chao, Hongyang; Enke, Charles Arthur.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 3662 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, 1999. p. 215-224.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Smith, CL, Chu, WK, Wobig, R, Chao, H & Enke, CA 1999, Using PACS and wavelet-based image compression in a wide-area-network to support radiation therapy imaging applications for satellite hospitals. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 3662, Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, pp. 215-224, Proceedings of the 1999 Medical Imaging - PACS Design and Evaluation Engineering and Clinical Issues, San Diego, CA, USA, 1/23/99.
Smith CL, Chu WK, Wobig R, Chao H, Enke CA. Using PACS and wavelet-based image compression in a wide-area-network to support radiation therapy imaging applications for satellite hospitals. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 3662. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. 1999. p. 215-224
Smith, Charles L. ; Chu, Wei Kom ; Wobig, Randy ; Chao, Hongyang ; Enke, Charles Arthur. / Using PACS and wavelet-based image compression in a wide-area-network to support radiation therapy imaging applications for satellite hospitals. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 3662 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, 1999. pp. 215-224
@inproceedings{2b69d77faa6540829aaf889a571fb94f,
title = "Using PACS and wavelet-based image compression in a wide-area-network to support radiation therapy imaging applications for satellite hospitals",
abstract = "An ongoing PACS project at our facility has been expanded to include providing and managing images used for routine clinical operation of the department of radiation oncology. The intent of our investigation has been to enable our clinical radiotherapy service to enter the tele-medicine environment through the use of a PACS system initially implemented in the department of radiology. The backbone for the imaging network includes five CT and three MR scanners located across three imaging centers. A PC workstation in the department of radiation oncology was used to transmit CT images to a satellite facility located approximately 60 miles from the primary center. Chest CT images were used to analyze network transmission performance. Connectivity established between the primary department and satellite has fulfilled all image criteria required by the oncologist. Establishing the link to the oncologist at the satellite diminished bottlenecking of imaging related tasks at the primary facility due to physician absence. A 30:1 compression ratio using a wavelet-based algorithm provided clinically acceptable images treatment planning. Clinical radiotherapy images can be effectively managed in a wide-area-network to link satellite facilities to larger clinical centers.",
author = "Smith, {Charles L.} and Chu, {Wei Kom} and Randy Wobig and Hongyang Chao and Enke, {Charles Arthur}",
year = "1999",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3662",
pages = "215--224",
booktitle = "Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering",
publisher = "Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Using PACS and wavelet-based image compression in a wide-area-network to support radiation therapy imaging applications for satellite hospitals

AU - Smith, Charles L.

AU - Chu, Wei Kom

AU - Wobig, Randy

AU - Chao, Hongyang

AU - Enke, Charles Arthur

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - An ongoing PACS project at our facility has been expanded to include providing and managing images used for routine clinical operation of the department of radiation oncology. The intent of our investigation has been to enable our clinical radiotherapy service to enter the tele-medicine environment through the use of a PACS system initially implemented in the department of radiology. The backbone for the imaging network includes five CT and three MR scanners located across three imaging centers. A PC workstation in the department of radiation oncology was used to transmit CT images to a satellite facility located approximately 60 miles from the primary center. Chest CT images were used to analyze network transmission performance. Connectivity established between the primary department and satellite has fulfilled all image criteria required by the oncologist. Establishing the link to the oncologist at the satellite diminished bottlenecking of imaging related tasks at the primary facility due to physician absence. A 30:1 compression ratio using a wavelet-based algorithm provided clinically acceptable images treatment planning. Clinical radiotherapy images can be effectively managed in a wide-area-network to link satellite facilities to larger clinical centers.

AB - An ongoing PACS project at our facility has been expanded to include providing and managing images used for routine clinical operation of the department of radiation oncology. The intent of our investigation has been to enable our clinical radiotherapy service to enter the tele-medicine environment through the use of a PACS system initially implemented in the department of radiology. The backbone for the imaging network includes five CT and three MR scanners located across three imaging centers. A PC workstation in the department of radiation oncology was used to transmit CT images to a satellite facility located approximately 60 miles from the primary center. Chest CT images were used to analyze network transmission performance. Connectivity established between the primary department and satellite has fulfilled all image criteria required by the oncologist. Establishing the link to the oncologist at the satellite diminished bottlenecking of imaging related tasks at the primary facility due to physician absence. A 30:1 compression ratio using a wavelet-based algorithm provided clinically acceptable images treatment planning. Clinical radiotherapy images can be effectively managed in a wide-area-network to link satellite facilities to larger clinical centers.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033359457&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033359457&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:0033359457

VL - 3662

SP - 215

EP - 224

BT - Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

PB - Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

ER -