Using eye movementsto identify hazardsmissed by at-risk workers

Sogand Hasanzadeh, Behzad Esmaeili, Michel D. Dodd, Eugenio Pellicer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Identifying hazardous situations is a complex and multidimensional cognitive process that requires the proper allocation of workers' attention. Eye-Tracking technologies provide a viable option for studying construction workers' attentional allocation and for linking attention to their hazard-identification capabilities. The objective of the study is to use eye-movement measures to determine which types of hazards construction workers miss, ignore, or perceive to be insignificant. In order to achieve this goal, 31 construction workers participated in a controlled laboratory experiment in which they searched for hazards in images of 35 real construction-site scenarios while a head-mounted EyeLink II tracked their eye movements. The results showed differences in the participants' attentional distributions and that the hazard identification of workers with low and high hazard-identification skills stems from the types of hazard-not the number of hazards-within the scenarios. Further investigation on five images revealed that at-risk workers dwelt on imminent danger (e.g., workers in dangerous areas) rather than spreading their attentional efforts searching for sources of non-obvious hazards, including electrical hazards, housekeeping hazards and fall-protection-system-related hazards. The results of this experiment can thus support personalized safety training that targets at-risk workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference
Subtitle of host publicationResilient Structures and Sustainable Construction
EditorsJose M. Adam, Eugenio Pellicer, Siamak Yazdani, Amarjit Singh, Victor Yepes
PublisherISEC Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780996043748
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Event9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction, ISEC 2017 - Valencia, Spain
Duration: Jul 24 2017Jul 29 2017

Publication series

NameISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction

Other

Other9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction, ISEC 2017
CountrySpain
CityValencia
Period7/24/177/29/17

Fingerprint

Hazards
Eye movements
Experiments

Keywords

  • Construction safety
  • Eye-Tracking
  • Hazard identification
  • Safety training
  • Visual attention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Hasanzadeh, S., Esmaeili, B., Dodd, M. D., & Pellicer, E. (2017). Using eye movementsto identify hazardsmissed by at-risk workers. In J. M. Adam, E. Pellicer, S. Yazdani, A. Singh, & V. Yepes (Eds.), ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction (ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction). ISEC Press.

Using eye movementsto identify hazardsmissed by at-risk workers. / Hasanzadeh, Sogand; Esmaeili, Behzad; Dodd, Michel D.; Pellicer, Eugenio.

ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction. ed. / Jose M. Adam; Eugenio Pellicer; Siamak Yazdani; Amarjit Singh; Victor Yepes. ISEC Press, 2017. (ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hasanzadeh, S, Esmaeili, B, Dodd, MD & Pellicer, E 2017, Using eye movementsto identify hazardsmissed by at-risk workers. in JM Adam, E Pellicer, S Yazdani, A Singh & V Yepes (eds), ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction. ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction, ISEC Press, 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction, ISEC 2017, Valencia, Spain, 7/24/17.
Hasanzadeh S, Esmaeili B, Dodd MD, Pellicer E. Using eye movementsto identify hazardsmissed by at-risk workers. In Adam JM, Pellicer E, Yazdani S, Singh A, Yepes V, editors, ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction. ISEC Press. 2017. (ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction).
Hasanzadeh, Sogand ; Esmaeili, Behzad ; Dodd, Michel D. ; Pellicer, Eugenio. / Using eye movementsto identify hazardsmissed by at-risk workers. ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction. editor / Jose M. Adam ; Eugenio Pellicer ; Siamak Yazdani ; Amarjit Singh ; Victor Yepes. ISEC Press, 2017. (ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction).
@inproceedings{42026d37db994097a53eed465d14b027,
title = "Using eye movementsto identify hazardsmissed by at-risk workers",
abstract = "Identifying hazardous situations is a complex and multidimensional cognitive process that requires the proper allocation of workers' attention. Eye-Tracking technologies provide a viable option for studying construction workers' attentional allocation and for linking attention to their hazard-identification capabilities. The objective of the study is to use eye-movement measures to determine which types of hazards construction workers miss, ignore, or perceive to be insignificant. In order to achieve this goal, 31 construction workers participated in a controlled laboratory experiment in which they searched for hazards in images of 35 real construction-site scenarios while a head-mounted EyeLink II tracked their eye movements. The results showed differences in the participants' attentional distributions and that the hazard identification of workers with low and high hazard-identification skills stems from the types of hazard-not the number of hazards-within the scenarios. Further investigation on five images revealed that at-risk workers dwelt on imminent danger (e.g., workers in dangerous areas) rather than spreading their attentional efforts searching for sources of non-obvious hazards, including electrical hazards, housekeeping hazards and fall-protection-system-related hazards. The results of this experiment can thus support personalized safety training that targets at-risk workers.",
keywords = "Construction safety, Eye-Tracking, Hazard identification, Safety training, Visual attention",
author = "Sogand Hasanzadeh and Behzad Esmaeili and Dodd, {Michel D.} and Eugenio Pellicer",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
series = "ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction",
publisher = "ISEC Press",
editor = "Adam, {Jose M.} and Eugenio Pellicer and Siamak Yazdani and Amarjit Singh and Victor Yepes",
booktitle = "ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Using eye movementsto identify hazardsmissed by at-risk workers

AU - Hasanzadeh, Sogand

AU - Esmaeili, Behzad

AU - Dodd, Michel D.

AU - Pellicer, Eugenio

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Identifying hazardous situations is a complex and multidimensional cognitive process that requires the proper allocation of workers' attention. Eye-Tracking technologies provide a viable option for studying construction workers' attentional allocation and for linking attention to their hazard-identification capabilities. The objective of the study is to use eye-movement measures to determine which types of hazards construction workers miss, ignore, or perceive to be insignificant. In order to achieve this goal, 31 construction workers participated in a controlled laboratory experiment in which they searched for hazards in images of 35 real construction-site scenarios while a head-mounted EyeLink II tracked their eye movements. The results showed differences in the participants' attentional distributions and that the hazard identification of workers with low and high hazard-identification skills stems from the types of hazard-not the number of hazards-within the scenarios. Further investigation on five images revealed that at-risk workers dwelt on imminent danger (e.g., workers in dangerous areas) rather than spreading their attentional efforts searching for sources of non-obvious hazards, including electrical hazards, housekeeping hazards and fall-protection-system-related hazards. The results of this experiment can thus support personalized safety training that targets at-risk workers.

AB - Identifying hazardous situations is a complex and multidimensional cognitive process that requires the proper allocation of workers' attention. Eye-Tracking technologies provide a viable option for studying construction workers' attentional allocation and for linking attention to their hazard-identification capabilities. The objective of the study is to use eye-movement measures to determine which types of hazards construction workers miss, ignore, or perceive to be insignificant. In order to achieve this goal, 31 construction workers participated in a controlled laboratory experiment in which they searched for hazards in images of 35 real construction-site scenarios while a head-mounted EyeLink II tracked their eye movements. The results showed differences in the participants' attentional distributions and that the hazard identification of workers with low and high hazard-identification skills stems from the types of hazard-not the number of hazards-within the scenarios. Further investigation on five images revealed that at-risk workers dwelt on imminent danger (e.g., workers in dangerous areas) rather than spreading their attentional efforts searching for sources of non-obvious hazards, including electrical hazards, housekeeping hazards and fall-protection-system-related hazards. The results of this experiment can thus support personalized safety training that targets at-risk workers.

KW - Construction safety

KW - Eye-Tracking

KW - Hazard identification

KW - Safety training

KW - Visual attention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85025599670&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85025599670&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:85025599670

T3 - ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference: Resilient Structures and Sustainable Construction

BT - ISEC 2017 - 9th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference

A2 - Adam, Jose M.

A2 - Pellicer, Eugenio

A2 - Yazdani, Siamak

A2 - Singh, Amarjit

A2 - Yepes, Victor

PB - ISEC Press

ER -