Using Caregiver Strain to Predict Participation in a Peer-Support Intervention for Parents of Children With Emotional or Behavioral Needs

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children receiving services for severe emotional and behavioral difficulties are less likely to have parents who are involved in their education and support services. Peer-to-peer family support programs are one approach to increasing the self-efficacy and empowerment of parents’ engagement in the treatment of a child’s mental health conditions. Furthermore, programs providing parental support may reduce the strain and negative consequences caregivers may experience due to the stress of caring for a child with emotional and behavioral needs. Although much is known about the relation between caregivers’ strain and children’s use of mental health services, less is known about caregiver strain and parents’ participation in family support programs. This study evaluated whether caregiver strain predicted parents’ (N = 52) participation in a phone-based, peer-to-peer support intervention. Results of the regression analysis indicated that highly strained parents participated in four to seven more phone conversations over the course of intervention, which occurred across the academic year. Therefore, findings have implications for the school and mental health providers aiming to increase the involvement of parents of children with emotional and behavioral disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)170-177
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Fingerprint

Caregivers
caregiver
parents
Parents
participation
mental health
Mental Health
School Health Services
Mental Health Services
Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
empowerment
regression analysis
health service
conversation
Regression Analysis
Education
school
education
experience

Keywords

  • caregiver strain
  • emotional disturbance
  • intervention participation
  • mental health services
  • parent engagement
  • parent support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Using Caregiver Strain to Predict Participation in a Peer-Support Intervention for Parents of Children With Emotional or Behavioral Needs",
abstract = "Children receiving services for severe emotional and behavioral difficulties are less likely to have parents who are involved in their education and support services. Peer-to-peer family support programs are one approach to increasing the self-efficacy and empowerment of parents’ engagement in the treatment of a child’s mental health conditions. Furthermore, programs providing parental support may reduce the strain and negative consequences caregivers may experience due to the stress of caring for a child with emotional and behavioral needs. Although much is known about the relation between caregivers’ strain and children’s use of mental health services, less is known about caregiver strain and parents’ participation in family support programs. This study evaluated whether caregiver strain predicted parents’ (N = 52) participation in a phone-based, peer-to-peer support intervention. Results of the regression analysis indicated that highly strained parents participated in four to seven more phone conversations over the course of intervention, which occurred across the academic year. Therefore, findings have implications for the school and mental health providers aiming to increase the involvement of parents of children with emotional and behavioral disorders.",
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author = "{Duppong Hurley}, {Kristin L} and January, {Stacy Ann A.} and Lambert, {Matthew C}",
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