Usher protein functions in hair cells and photoreceptors

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The 10 different genes associated with the deaf/blind disorder, Usher syndrome, encode a number of structurally and functionally distinct proteins, most expressed as multiple isoforms/protein variants. Functional characterization of these proteins suggests a role in stereocilia development in cochlear hair cells, likely owing to adhesive interactions in hair bundles. In mature hair cells, homodimers of the Usher cadherins, cadherin 23 and protocadherin 15, interact to form a structural fiber, the tip link, and the linkages that anchor the taller stereocilia's actin cytoskeleton core to the shorter adjacent stereocilia and the elusive mechanotransduction channels, explaining the deafness phenotype when these molecular interactions are perturbed. The conundrum is that photoreceptors lack a synonymous mechanotransduction apparatus, and so a common theory for Usher protein function in the two neurosensory cell types affected in Usher syndrome is lacking. Recent evidence linking photoreceptor cell dysfunction in the shaker 1 mouse model for Usher syndrome to light-induced protein translocation defects, combined with localization of an Usher protein interactome at the periciliary region of the photoreceptors suggests Usher proteins might regulate protein trafficking between the inner and outer segments of photoreceptors. A distinct Usher protein complex is trafficked to the ribbon synapses of hair cells, and synaptic defects have been reported in Usher mutants in both hair cells and photoreceptors. This review aims to clarify what is known about Usher protein function at the synaptic and apical poles of hair cells and photoreceptors and the prospects for identifying a unifying pathobiological mechanism to explain deaf/blindness in Usher syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)80-89
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Photoreceptor Cells
Usher Syndromes
Cells
Stereocilia
Proteins
Protein Transport
Cadherins
Auditory Hair Cells
Deaf-Blind Disorders
Deafness
Blindness
Actin Cytoskeleton
Defects
Adhesives
Synapses
Molecular interactions
Protein Isoforms
Anchors
Actins
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Cochlear hair cell
  • Mechanotransduction
  • Photoreceptor
  • Ribbon synapse
  • Usher syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Usher protein functions in hair cells and photoreceptors. / Cosgrove, Dominic E; Zallocchi, Marisa L.

In: International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Vol. 46, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 80-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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