Use of Temporary Partial Intrailiac Balloon Occlusion for Decreasing Blood Loss During Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of Acetabular and Pelvis Fractures

Justin Siebler, Thomas DiPasquale, H. Claude Sagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients with pelvic and/or acetabular fractures can sustain significant blood loss at the time of their injury and during surgery. We report on the technique, effect on blood loss, and complications with the use of temporary partial intrailiac balloon occlusion during open reduction and internal fixation of pelvic and acetabular fractures in a series of patients refusing allogeneic blood products for philosophical or religious reasons. An intra-arterial balloon is positioned in the common iliac artery immediately preoperatively, ipsilateral to the fracture in the interventional radiography suite. This balloon is then periodically inflated and deflated throughout the case by the anesthesiologist to mitigate operative blood loss. For anterior approaches, average blood loss was significantly less for those patients operated with temporary partial intrailiac balloon occlusion compared with those without. For posterior approaches, blood loss was not significantly different. One complication occurred in a patient who developed an arterial thrombus requiring surgical removal by the vascular surgery service at the conclusion of the orthopaedic surgery. He had no further sequelae. Although not recommended for routine use in all pelvic and acetabular fractures, we feel the use of temporary partial intrailiac balloon occlusion merits further study and may be beneficial in reducing blood loss during anterior pelvic or acetabular procedures in those patients who are opposed to allogeneic blood products and cell saver or those who cannot tolerate an anticipated massive blood loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e54-e57
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Trauma
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

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Balloon Occlusion
Pelvis
Interventional Radiography
Iliac Artery
Orthopedics
Blood Vessels
Blood Cells
Thrombosis
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Acetabulum fracture
  • Blood loss
  • Pelvic fracture
  • Temporary arterial occlusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Use of Temporary Partial Intrailiac Balloon Occlusion for Decreasing Blood Loss During Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of Acetabular and Pelvis Fractures. / Siebler, Justin; DiPasquale, Thomas; Sagi, H. Claude.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Vol. 26, No. 6, 06.2012, p. e54-e57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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