Use of stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions to investigate efferent and cochlear contributions to temporal overshoot

Douglas H Keefe, Kim S. Schairer, John C. Ellison, Denis F. Fitzpatrick, Walt Jesteadt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Behavioral threshold for a tone burst presented in a long-duration noise masker decreases as the onset of the tone burst is delayed relative to masker onset. The threshold difference between detection of early- and late-onset tone bursts is called overshoot. Although the underlying mechanisms are unclear, one hypothesis is that overshoot occurs due to efferent suppression of cochlear nonlinearity [von Klitzing, R., and Kohlrausch, A. (1994). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 2192-2201]. This hypothesis was tested by using overshoot conditions to elicit stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs), which provide a physiological measure of cochlear nonlinearity. SFOAE and behavioral thresholds were estimated using a modified maximum-likelihood yes-no procedure. The masker was a 400-ms "frozen" notched noise. The signal was a 20-ms, 4-kHz tone burst presented at 1 or 200 ms after the noise onset. Behavioral overshoot results replicated previous studies, but no overshoot was observed in SFOAE thresholds. This suggests that either efferent suppression of cochlear nonlinearity is not involved in overshoot, or a SFOAE threshold estimation procedure based on stimuli similar to those used to study behavioral overshoot is not sensitive enough to measure the effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1595-1604
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume125
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2009

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stimuli
bursts
thresholds
nonlinearity
retarding
Stimulus
Onset
Nonlinearity
Suppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Use of stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions to investigate efferent and cochlear contributions to temporal overshoot. / Keefe, Douglas H; Schairer, Kim S.; Ellison, John C.; Fitzpatrick, Denis F.; Jesteadt, Walt.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 125, No. 3, 19.03.2009, p. 1595-1604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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