Use of stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emission latency and level to investigate cochlear mechanics in human ears

Kim S. Schairer, John C. Ellison, Denis Fitzpatrick, Douglas H Keefe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE) sound pressure level (SPL) and latency were measured at probe frequencies from 500 to 4000 Hz and probe levels from 40 to 70 dB SPL in 16 normal-hearing adult ears. The main goal was to use SFOAE latency estimates to better understand possible source mechanisms such as linear coherent reflection, nonlinear distortion, and reverse transmission via the cochlear fluid, and how those sources might change as a function of stimulus level. Another goal was to use SFOAE latencies to noninvasively estimate cochlear tuning. SFOAEs were dominated by the reflection source at low stimulus levels, consistent with previous research, but neither nonlinear distortion nor fluid compression become the dominant source even at the highest stimulus level. At each stimulus level, the SFOAE latency was an approximately constant number of periods from 1000 to 4000 Hz, consistent with cochlear scaling symmetry. SFOAE latency decreased with increasing stimulus level in an approximately frequency-independent manner. Tuning estimates were constant above 1000 Hz, consistent with simultaneous masking data, but in contrast to previous estimates from SFOAEs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)901-914
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume120
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

Fingerprint

ear
stimuli
estimates
sound pressure
tuning
Ear
Stimulus
Latency
probes
fluids
hearing
masking
scaling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Use of stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emission latency and level to investigate cochlear mechanics in human ears. / Schairer, Kim S.; Ellison, John C.; Fitzpatrick, Denis; Keefe, Douglas H.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 120, No. 2, 01.08.2006, p. 901-914.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a6d79a8b85194715a5a034226d66ef7a,
title = "Use of stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emission latency and level to investigate cochlear mechanics in human ears",
abstract = "Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE) sound pressure level (SPL) and latency were measured at probe frequencies from 500 to 4000 Hz and probe levels from 40 to 70 dB SPL in 16 normal-hearing adult ears. The main goal was to use SFOAE latency estimates to better understand possible source mechanisms such as linear coherent reflection, nonlinear distortion, and reverse transmission via the cochlear fluid, and how those sources might change as a function of stimulus level. Another goal was to use SFOAE latencies to noninvasively estimate cochlear tuning. SFOAEs were dominated by the reflection source at low stimulus levels, consistent with previous research, but neither nonlinear distortion nor fluid compression become the dominant source even at the highest stimulus level. At each stimulus level, the SFOAE latency was an approximately constant number of periods from 1000 to 4000 Hz, consistent with cochlear scaling symmetry. SFOAE latency decreased with increasing stimulus level in an approximately frequency-independent manner. Tuning estimates were constant above 1000 Hz, consistent with simultaneous masking data, but in contrast to previous estimates from SFOAEs.",
author = "Schairer, {Kim S.} and Ellison, {John C.} and Denis Fitzpatrick and Keefe, {Douglas H}",
year = "2006",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1121/1.2214147",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "120",
pages = "901--914",
journal = "Journal of the Acoustical Society of America",
issn = "0001-4966",
publisher = "Acoustical Society of America",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emission latency and level to investigate cochlear mechanics in human ears

AU - Schairer, Kim S.

AU - Ellison, John C.

AU - Fitzpatrick, Denis

AU - Keefe, Douglas H

PY - 2006/8/1

Y1 - 2006/8/1

N2 - Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE) sound pressure level (SPL) and latency were measured at probe frequencies from 500 to 4000 Hz and probe levels from 40 to 70 dB SPL in 16 normal-hearing adult ears. The main goal was to use SFOAE latency estimates to better understand possible source mechanisms such as linear coherent reflection, nonlinear distortion, and reverse transmission via the cochlear fluid, and how those sources might change as a function of stimulus level. Another goal was to use SFOAE latencies to noninvasively estimate cochlear tuning. SFOAEs were dominated by the reflection source at low stimulus levels, consistent with previous research, but neither nonlinear distortion nor fluid compression become the dominant source even at the highest stimulus level. At each stimulus level, the SFOAE latency was an approximately constant number of periods from 1000 to 4000 Hz, consistent with cochlear scaling symmetry. SFOAE latency decreased with increasing stimulus level in an approximately frequency-independent manner. Tuning estimates were constant above 1000 Hz, consistent with simultaneous masking data, but in contrast to previous estimates from SFOAEs.

AB - Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE) sound pressure level (SPL) and latency were measured at probe frequencies from 500 to 4000 Hz and probe levels from 40 to 70 dB SPL in 16 normal-hearing adult ears. The main goal was to use SFOAE latency estimates to better understand possible source mechanisms such as linear coherent reflection, nonlinear distortion, and reverse transmission via the cochlear fluid, and how those sources might change as a function of stimulus level. Another goal was to use SFOAE latencies to noninvasively estimate cochlear tuning. SFOAEs were dominated by the reflection source at low stimulus levels, consistent with previous research, but neither nonlinear distortion nor fluid compression become the dominant source even at the highest stimulus level. At each stimulus level, the SFOAE latency was an approximately constant number of periods from 1000 to 4000 Hz, consistent with cochlear scaling symmetry. SFOAE latency decreased with increasing stimulus level in an approximately frequency-independent manner. Tuning estimates were constant above 1000 Hz, consistent with simultaneous masking data, but in contrast to previous estimates from SFOAEs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33747069679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33747069679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1121/1.2214147

DO - 10.1121/1.2214147

M3 - Article

C2 - 16938978

AN - SCOPUS:33747069679

VL - 120

SP - 901

EP - 914

JO - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

JF - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

SN - 0001-4966

IS - 2

ER -