Use of Galactose-Fermenting Streptococcus thermophilus in the Manufacture of Swiss, Mozzarella, and Short-Method Cheddar Cheese

Robert W Hutkins, S. M. Halambeck, H. A. Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Galactose-fermenting (galactose-positive) strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, alone and combined with galactose-positive and galactose-negative strains of Lactobacillus bulgaricus, were used as starter cultures in the manufacture of Swiss and Mozzarella cheese and were paired with Streptococcus lactis (also galactose-positive) in short-method Cheddar cheese manufacture. Experimental Swiss cheese made with the galactose-positive Streptococcus thermophilus starter alone contained a large amount of galactose (ca. 26 to 28 µmol/g of curd) 28 h after hooping compared with control Swiss (< 2 µmol/g) made with a nongalactose fermenting strain of Streptococcus thermophilus and a galactose-positive strain of Lactobacillus bulgaricus. Mozzarella and short-method Cheddar made with only galactose-positive Streptococcus thermophilus also contained large amounts of galactose. Swiss cheese made with a galactose-positive strain of Streptococcus thermophilus and a galactose-negative strain of Lactobacillus bulgaricus had little galactose remaining after 28 h, indicating that the Lactobacillus had a stimulatory effect on galactose metabolism in Streptococcus thermophilus. These results indicate that galactose-fermenting Streptococcus thermophilus may have limited potential when used as single strain starter cultures in Swiss cheese, but may be useful when combined with galactose-positive Lactobacillus in the manufacture of Mozzarella cheese.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Dairy Science
Volume69
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

Fingerprint

Streptococcus thermophilus
Cheddar cheese
Cheese
Galactose
galactose
manufacturing
Swiss cheese
Lactobacillus delbrueckii
methodology
Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus
mozzarella cheese
Lactobacillus
starter cultures
single strain starters
Lactococcus lactis
milk curds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Use of Galactose-Fermenting Streptococcus thermophilus in the Manufacture of Swiss, Mozzarella, and Short-Method Cheddar Cheese. / Hutkins, Robert W; Halambeck, S. M.; Morris, H. A.

In: Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 69, No. 1, 01.01.1986, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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