Use of dimethylsulfoxide to prevent clumping during feulgen staining of ceratocystis ulmi

Donna J. Mcneel, Kenneth W. Nickerson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The dimorphic fungus Ceratocystis ulmi is the causative agent of Dutch Elm Disease. As part of a study on the regulation of this developmental phenomenon, we attempted to stain the nuclei of cells growing vegetatively in the yeast phase by a modification of the Feulgen technique described by Gauger (1975). The cells were harvested by centrifugation, washed twice, and resuspended in 0.05 M phosphate buffer (pH 6.5). A small portion of this cell suspension was placed on a clean No. 2 glass coverslip (22 ± 22 mm) and allowed to air dry. The coverslip was flamed briefly to heat fix the cells whereupon they were fixed in glacial acetic acid: 95% ethanol (1:3 v/v) for one hour, hydrolyzed in 1 N hydrochloric acid at 60 C for 5 minutes, and stained for 30 minutes. The Feulgen stain was prepared according to Stevens (1974). Subsequently, the coverslip was rinsed briefly with distilled water and dehydrated for 30 seconds in 70% ethanol. After air drying, the coverslip was mounted on a glass microscope slide with Permount (Fisher Scientific Co.) and examined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalBiotechnic and Histochemistry
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982

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Ulmus
Dimethyl Sulfoxide
Staining and Labeling
Glass
Ethanol
Air
Hydrochloric Acid
Cell Nucleus
Centrifugation
Acetic Acid
Suspensions
Buffers
Fungi
Coloring Agents
Hot Temperature
Yeasts
Phosphates
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Histology
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

Cite this

Use of dimethylsulfoxide to prevent clumping during feulgen staining of ceratocystis ulmi. / Mcneel, Donna J.; Nickerson, Kenneth W.

In: Biotechnic and Histochemistry, Vol. 57, No. 2, 01.01.1982.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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