Use of cultured cells to study alcohol metabolism

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of cells grown in the laboratory (i.e., cultured cells) in alcohol research has many advantages. Among these are the ability to investigate individual metabolic pathways, the ability to precisely control exposure to ethanol and its metabolites in the absence of confounding variables, and the uniformity of genetically identical (i.e., clonal) cell lines. Additionally, because of the cost and relative ease of culturing large quantities of cells, many more experimental replicas may be performed to confirm findings. As described in this article, the use of cultured cells has contributed greatly to the understanding of the mechanisms by which alcohol metabolism affects cells and ultimately results in alcoholic liver disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-295
Number of pages5
JournalAlcohol Research and Health
Volume29
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

Fingerprint

Cultured Cells
Alcohols
Alcoholic Liver Diseases
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Ethanol
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cell Line
Research

Keywords

  • Abuse, and dependence
  • Acetaldehyde
  • Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)
  • Alcoholic fatty liver
  • Alcoholic liver disease
  • Cultured cells
  • Cytochrome P450 2E1
  • Ethanol metabolism
  • Ethanol metabolite
  • Hepatocyte
  • Recombinant cell lines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Use of cultured cells to study alcohol metabolism. / Clemens, Dahn L.

In: Alcohol Research and Health, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.12.2006, p. 291-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{c76ba6e4110141e78c5a83e781f93673,
title = "Use of cultured cells to study alcohol metabolism",
abstract = "The use of cells grown in the laboratory (i.e., cultured cells) in alcohol research has many advantages. Among these are the ability to investigate individual metabolic pathways, the ability to precisely control exposure to ethanol and its metabolites in the absence of confounding variables, and the uniformity of genetically identical (i.e., clonal) cell lines. Additionally, because of the cost and relative ease of culturing large quantities of cells, many more experimental replicas may be performed to confirm findings. As described in this article, the use of cultured cells has contributed greatly to the understanding of the mechanisms by which alcohol metabolism affects cells and ultimately results in alcoholic liver disease.",
keywords = "Abuse, and dependence, Acetaldehyde, Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), Alcoholic fatty liver, Alcoholic liver disease, Cultured cells, Cytochrome P450 2E1, Ethanol metabolism, Ethanol metabolite, Hepatocyte, Recombinant cell lines",
author = "Clemens, {Dahn L}",
year = "2006",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "291--295",
journal = "Alcohol research : current reviews",
issn = "2168-3492",
publisher = "National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of cultured cells to study alcohol metabolism

AU - Clemens, Dahn L

PY - 2006/12/1

Y1 - 2006/12/1

N2 - The use of cells grown in the laboratory (i.e., cultured cells) in alcohol research has many advantages. Among these are the ability to investigate individual metabolic pathways, the ability to precisely control exposure to ethanol and its metabolites in the absence of confounding variables, and the uniformity of genetically identical (i.e., clonal) cell lines. Additionally, because of the cost and relative ease of culturing large quantities of cells, many more experimental replicas may be performed to confirm findings. As described in this article, the use of cultured cells has contributed greatly to the understanding of the mechanisms by which alcohol metabolism affects cells and ultimately results in alcoholic liver disease.

AB - The use of cells grown in the laboratory (i.e., cultured cells) in alcohol research has many advantages. Among these are the ability to investigate individual metabolic pathways, the ability to precisely control exposure to ethanol and its metabolites in the absence of confounding variables, and the uniformity of genetically identical (i.e., clonal) cell lines. Additionally, because of the cost and relative ease of culturing large quantities of cells, many more experimental replicas may be performed to confirm findings. As described in this article, the use of cultured cells has contributed greatly to the understanding of the mechanisms by which alcohol metabolism affects cells and ultimately results in alcoholic liver disease.

KW - Abuse, and dependence

KW - Acetaldehyde

KW - Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)

KW - Alcoholic fatty liver

KW - Alcoholic liver disease

KW - Cultured cells

KW - Cytochrome P450 2E1

KW - Ethanol metabolism

KW - Ethanol metabolite

KW - Hepatocyte

KW - Recombinant cell lines

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34347217524&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34347217524&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

C2 - 17718409

AN - SCOPUS:34347217524

VL - 29

SP - 291

EP - 295

JO - Alcohol research : current reviews

JF - Alcohol research : current reviews

SN - 2168-3492

IS - 4

ER -