Use of a Web-Based Game to Teach Pediatric Content to Medical Students

Katherine A. Sward, Stephanie Richardson, Jeremy Kendrick, Chris Maloney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess, using a Web-based format, third-year medical students' pediatric knowledge and perceptions of game playing with faculty facilitation compared with self-study computerized flash cards. Methods: This study used a repeated-measures experimental design with random assignment to a game group or self-study group. Pediatric knowledge was tested using multiple choice exams at baseline, week 6 of the clerkship following a 4-week intervention, and 6 weeks later. Perceptions about game playing and self-study were evaluated using a questionnaire at week 6. Results: The groups did not differ on content mastery, perceptions about content, or time involved in game playing or self-study. Perceptions about game playing versus self-study as a pedagogical method appeared to favor game playing in understanding content (P < .001), perceived help with learning (P < .05), and enjoyment of learning (P < .008). An important difference was increased game group willingness to continue participating in the intervention. Conclusions: Games can be an enjoyable and motivating method for learning pediatric content, enhanced by group interactions, competition, and fun. Computerized, Web-based tools can facilitate access to educational resources and are feasible to apply as an adjunct to teaching clinical medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-359
Number of pages6
JournalAmbulatory Pediatrics
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

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Medical Students
Learning
Pediatrics
Clinical Medicine
Teaching
Research Design

Keywords

  • Web-based game
  • active learning
  • informatics
  • medical education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Use of a Web-Based Game to Teach Pediatric Content to Medical Students. / Sward, Katherine A.; Richardson, Stephanie; Kendrick, Jeremy; Maloney, Chris.

In: Ambulatory Pediatrics, Vol. 8, No. 6, 01.11.2008, p. 354-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sward, Katherine A. ; Richardson, Stephanie ; Kendrick, Jeremy ; Maloney, Chris. / Use of a Web-Based Game to Teach Pediatric Content to Medical Students. In: Ambulatory Pediatrics. 2008 ; Vol. 8, No. 6. pp. 354-359.
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