Update on dexmedetomidine

Use in nonintubated patients requiring sedation for surgical procedures

Mohanad Shukry, Jeffrey A. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dexmedetomidine was introduced two decades ago as a sedative and supplement to sedation in the intensive care unit for patients whose trachea was intubated. However, since that time dexmedetomidine has been commonly used as a sedative and hypnotic for patients undergoing procedures without the need for tracheal intubation. This review focuses on the application of dexmedetomidine as a sedative and/or total anesthetic in patients undergoing procedures without the need for tracheal intubation. Dexmedetomidine was used for sedation in monitored anesthesia care (MAC), airway procedures including fiberoptic bronchoscopy, dental procedures, ophthalmological procedures, head and neck procedures, neurosurgery, and vascular surgery. Additionally, dexmedetomidine was used for the sedation of pediatric patients undergoing different type of procedures such as cardiac catheterization and magnetic resonance imaging. Dexmedetomidine loading dose ranged from 0.5 to 5 μg kg-1, and infusion dose ranged from 0.2 to 10 μg kg-1 h-1. Dexmedetomidine was administered in conjunction with local anesthesia and/or other sedatives. Ketamine was administered with dexmedetomidine and opposed its bradycardiac effects. Dexmedetomidine may by useful in patients needing sedation without tracheal intubation. The literature suggests potential use of dexmedetomidine solely or as an adjunctive agent to other sedation agents. Dexmedetomidine was especially useful when spontaneous breathing was essential such as in procedures on the airway, or when sudden awakening from sedation was required such as for cooperative clinical examination during craniotomies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-121
Number of pages11
JournalTherapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
Volume6
Issue number1
StatePublished - Apr 19 2010

Fingerprint

Dexmedetomidine
Neurosurgery
Intensive care units
Anesthetics
Pediatrics
Magnetic resonance
Surgery
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Imaging techniques
Intubation
pharmaceutical
surgery
supplement
Craniotomy
Ketamine
Bronchoscopy
Local Anesthesia
Cardiac Catheterization
Trachea
Blood Vessels

Keywords

  • Dexmedetomidine
  • Nonintubated patients
  • Sedation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety Research
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Chemical Health and Safety

Cite this

Update on dexmedetomidine : Use in nonintubated patients requiring sedation for surgical procedures. / Shukry, Mohanad; Miller, Jeffrey A.

In: Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, Vol. 6, No. 1, 19.04.2010, p. 111-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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