Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for Construction Safety Applications

Masoud Gheisari, Behzad Esmaeili

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Researchers have suggested using different types of technologies, such as wireless sensors, radio-frequency identification (RFID), and global positioning system (GPS), to improve safety performance and reduce potential for human errors on construction job sites. One emerging technology that provides immense promise to positively impact safety performance is the unmanned aerial system (UAS). UASs, or drones, can provide several advantages for safety managers: they can move faster than humans, can reach inaccessible areas of job sites, and can be equipped with video cameras, wireless sensors, radar, or communication hardware to transfer real-time data. This study was conducted to identify safety practices that can be improved by using UASs and distinguish user and technical requirements to successfully assist safety managers in conducting their tasks using such aerial systems. These objectives were achieved by distributing an online survey among safety managers in Florida, Georgia, and Nebraska. In total, twenty-two safety mangers responded to the survey and rated as most important three hazardous activities that UASs have great potential to improve: working in proximity of boomed vehicles/cranes, working near an unprotected edge/opening, and working in the blind spot of heavy equipment. In terms of using UASs for safety inspection applications, the top three required technical features rated by safety managers were real-time video communication (video sensor), high-precision outdoor navigation, and sense-and-avoid. These findings can help professionals recognize potential applications and technical requirements and challenges in which UASs can be useful in construction safety practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConstruction Research Congress 2016
Subtitle of host publicationOld and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan - Proceedings of the 2016 Construction Research Congress, CRC 2016
EditorsJose L. Perdomo-Rivera, Carla Lopez del Puerto, Antonio Gonzalez-Quevedo, Francisco Maldonado-Fortunet, Omar I. Molina-Bas
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages2642-2650
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9780784479827
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
EventConstruction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan, CRC 2016 - San Juan, Puerto Rico
Duration: May 31 2016Jun 2 2016

Publication series

NameConstruction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan - Proceedings of the 2016 Construction Research Congress, CRC 2016

Other

OtherConstruction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan, CRC 2016
CountryPuerto Rico
CitySan Juan
Period5/31/166/2/16

Fingerprint

Antennas
Managers
Sensors
Communication
Video cameras
Cranes
Radio frequency identification (RFID)
Global positioning system
Navigation
Radar
Inspection
Hardware

Keywords

  • Construction safety
  • Drones
  • Human-centered technology; Application requirements
  • Unmanned aerial systems (UASs)
  • Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Gheisari, M., & Esmaeili, B. (2016). Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for Construction Safety Applications. In J. L. Perdomo-Rivera, C. Lopez del Puerto, A. Gonzalez-Quevedo, F. Maldonado-Fortunet, & O. I. Molina-Bas (Eds.), Construction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan - Proceedings of the 2016 Construction Research Congress, CRC 2016 (pp. 2642-2650). (Construction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan - Proceedings of the 2016 Construction Research Congress, CRC 2016). American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784479827.263

Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for Construction Safety Applications. / Gheisari, Masoud; Esmaeili, Behzad.

Construction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan - Proceedings of the 2016 Construction Research Congress, CRC 2016. ed. / Jose L. Perdomo-Rivera; Carla Lopez del Puerto; Antonio Gonzalez-Quevedo; Francisco Maldonado-Fortunet; Omar I. Molina-Bas. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2016. p. 2642-2650 (Construction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan - Proceedings of the 2016 Construction Research Congress, CRC 2016).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gheisari, M & Esmaeili, B 2016, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for Construction Safety Applications. in JL Perdomo-Rivera, C Lopez del Puerto, A Gonzalez-Quevedo, F Maldonado-Fortunet & OI Molina-Bas (eds), Construction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan - Proceedings of the 2016 Construction Research Congress, CRC 2016. Construction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan - Proceedings of the 2016 Construction Research Congress, CRC 2016, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), pp. 2642-2650, Construction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan, CRC 2016, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 5/31/16. https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784479827.263
Gheisari M, Esmaeili B. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for Construction Safety Applications. In Perdomo-Rivera JL, Lopez del Puerto C, Gonzalez-Quevedo A, Maldonado-Fortunet F, Molina-Bas OI, editors, Construction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan - Proceedings of the 2016 Construction Research Congress, CRC 2016. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 2016. p. 2642-2650. (Construction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan - Proceedings of the 2016 Construction Research Congress, CRC 2016). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784479827.263
Gheisari, Masoud ; Esmaeili, Behzad. / Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for Construction Safety Applications. Construction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan - Proceedings of the 2016 Construction Research Congress, CRC 2016. editor / Jose L. Perdomo-Rivera ; Carla Lopez del Puerto ; Antonio Gonzalez-Quevedo ; Francisco Maldonado-Fortunet ; Omar I. Molina-Bas. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2016. pp. 2642-2650 (Construction Research Congress 2016: Old and New Construction Technologies Converge in Historic San Juan - Proceedings of the 2016 Construction Research Congress, CRC 2016).
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