Understanding water uptake in bioaerosols using laboratory measurements, field tests and modeling

Zahra Chaudhry, Shanna A. Ratnesar-Shumate, Thomas J. Buckley, Jeffrey M. Kalter, Jerome U. Gilberry, Jonathan P. Eshbaugh, Elizabeth C. Corson, Joshua L. Santarpia, Christopher C. Carter

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Uptake of water by biological aerosols can impact their physical and chemical characteristics. The water content in a bioaerosol can affect the backscatter cross-section as measured by LIDAR systems. Better understanding of the water content in controlled-release clouds of bioaerosols can aid in the development of improved standoff detection systems. This study includes three methods to improve understanding of how bioaerosols take up water. The laboratory method measures hygroscopic growth of biological material after it is aerosolized and dried. Hygroscopicity curves are created as the humidity is increased in small increments to observe the deliquescence point, then the humidity is decreased to observe the efflorescence point. The field component of the study measures particle size distributions of biological material disseminated into a large humidified chamber. Measurements are made with a Twin-Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS, TSI, Inc), -Relative Humidity apparatus where two APS units measure the same aerosol cloud side-by-side. The first operated under dry conditions by sampling downstream of desiccant dryers, the second operated under ambient conditions. Relative humidity was measured within the sampling systems to determine the difference in the aerosol water content between the two sampling trains. The water content of the bioaerosols was calculated from the twin APS units following Khlystov et al. 2005 [1]. Biological material is measured dried and wet and compared to laboratory curves of the same material. Lastly, theoretical curves are constructed from literature values for components of the bioaerosol material.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationChemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XIV
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 8 2013
EventChemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XIV - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: Apr 30 2013May 3 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume8710
ISSN (Print)0277-786X
ISSN (Electronic)1996-756X

Other

OtherChemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XIV
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore, MD
Period4/30/135/3/13

Fingerprint

Water Uptake
field tests
Water content
Water Content
moisture content
humidity
Atmospheric humidity
Aerosols
Biological materials
Aerosol
aerosols
Water
sampling
Sampling
Modeling
Relative Humidity
water
Humidity
curves
Efflorescence

Keywords

  • Bioaerosols
  • Deliquescence
  • Efflorescence
  • Field test
  • Hygroscopicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Chaudhry, Z., Ratnesar-Shumate, S. A., Buckley, T. J., Kalter, J. M., Gilberry, J. U., Eshbaugh, J. P., ... Carter, C. C. (2013). Understanding water uptake in bioaerosols using laboratory measurements, field tests and modeling. In Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XIV [871017] (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 8710). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2016151

Understanding water uptake in bioaerosols using laboratory measurements, field tests and modeling. / Chaudhry, Zahra; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna A.; Buckley, Thomas J.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Gilberry, Jerome U.; Eshbaugh, Jonathan P.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Carter, Christopher C.

Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XIV. 2013. 871017 (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 8710).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Chaudhry, Z, Ratnesar-Shumate, SA, Buckley, TJ, Kalter, JM, Gilberry, JU, Eshbaugh, JP, Corson, EC, Santarpia, JL & Carter, CC 2013, Understanding water uptake in bioaerosols using laboratory measurements, field tests and modeling. in Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XIV., 871017, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 8710, Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XIV, Baltimore, MD, United States, 4/30/13. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2016151
Chaudhry Z, Ratnesar-Shumate SA, Buckley TJ, Kalter JM, Gilberry JU, Eshbaugh JP et al. Understanding water uptake in bioaerosols using laboratory measurements, field tests and modeling. In Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XIV. 2013. 871017. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2016151
Chaudhry, Zahra ; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna A. ; Buckley, Thomas J. ; Kalter, Jeffrey M. ; Gilberry, Jerome U. ; Eshbaugh, Jonathan P. ; Corson, Elizabeth C. ; Santarpia, Joshua L. ; Carter, Christopher C. / Understanding water uptake in bioaerosols using laboratory measurements, field tests and modeling. Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XIV. 2013. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering).
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