Understanding mental health needs of Southeast Asian refugees: Historical, cultural, and contextual challenges

Eugenia Hsu, Corrie A. Davies, David J Hansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research and clinical information pertaining to mental health needs of Asians residing in the United States is limited but growing. There is a tendency to group all persons of Asian descent together and, therefore, the empirical literature does not sufficiently address the mental health needs in specific subgroups. The focus of this article is to understand the mental health needs of one subgroup of Asians - Southeast Asian refugees (SEAR). The main purpose is to review the relevant literature pertaining to Southeast Asian refugees' experiences and to understand the manifestation of psychiatric disorders by examining historical, cultural, and contextual challenges. Despite the well-documented mental health needs for SEAR, most do not present for mental health services. Therefore, resilience and protective factors are discussed. Research and clinical implications are described and suggestions are offered on how to apply information obtained from Southeast Asian refugees' experiences to future refugees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-213
Number of pages21
JournalClinical Psychology Review
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

Fingerprint

Refugees
Mental Health
Mental Health Services
Research
Psychiatry

Keywords

  • Cultural issues
  • Mental health
  • Protective factors
  • Refugees
  • Southeast Asian

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Understanding mental health needs of Southeast Asian refugees : Historical, cultural, and contextual challenges. / Hsu, Eugenia; Davies, Corrie A.; Hansen, David J.

In: Clinical Psychology Review, Vol. 24, No. 2, 05.2004, p. 193-213.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0bde1006b17343ff816a2826b58bc8c9,
title = "Understanding mental health needs of Southeast Asian refugees: Historical, cultural, and contextual challenges",
abstract = "Research and clinical information pertaining to mental health needs of Asians residing in the United States is limited but growing. There is a tendency to group all persons of Asian descent together and, therefore, the empirical literature does not sufficiently address the mental health needs in specific subgroups. The focus of this article is to understand the mental health needs of one subgroup of Asians - Southeast Asian refugees (SEAR). The main purpose is to review the relevant literature pertaining to Southeast Asian refugees' experiences and to understand the manifestation of psychiatric disorders by examining historical, cultural, and contextual challenges. Despite the well-documented mental health needs for SEAR, most do not present for mental health services. Therefore, resilience and protective factors are discussed. Research and clinical implications are described and suggestions are offered on how to apply information obtained from Southeast Asian refugees' experiences to future refugees.",
keywords = "Cultural issues, Mental health, Protective factors, Refugees, Southeast Asian",
author = "Eugenia Hsu and Davies, {Corrie A.} and Hansen, {David J}",
year = "2004",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.cpr.2003.10.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "193--213",
journal = "Clinical Psychology Review",
issn = "0272-7358",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Understanding mental health needs of Southeast Asian refugees

T2 - Historical, cultural, and contextual challenges

AU - Hsu, Eugenia

AU - Davies, Corrie A.

AU - Hansen, David J

PY - 2004/5

Y1 - 2004/5

N2 - Research and clinical information pertaining to mental health needs of Asians residing in the United States is limited but growing. There is a tendency to group all persons of Asian descent together and, therefore, the empirical literature does not sufficiently address the mental health needs in specific subgroups. The focus of this article is to understand the mental health needs of one subgroup of Asians - Southeast Asian refugees (SEAR). The main purpose is to review the relevant literature pertaining to Southeast Asian refugees' experiences and to understand the manifestation of psychiatric disorders by examining historical, cultural, and contextual challenges. Despite the well-documented mental health needs for SEAR, most do not present for mental health services. Therefore, resilience and protective factors are discussed. Research and clinical implications are described and suggestions are offered on how to apply information obtained from Southeast Asian refugees' experiences to future refugees.

AB - Research and clinical information pertaining to mental health needs of Asians residing in the United States is limited but growing. There is a tendency to group all persons of Asian descent together and, therefore, the empirical literature does not sufficiently address the mental health needs in specific subgroups. The focus of this article is to understand the mental health needs of one subgroup of Asians - Southeast Asian refugees (SEAR). The main purpose is to review the relevant literature pertaining to Southeast Asian refugees' experiences and to understand the manifestation of psychiatric disorders by examining historical, cultural, and contextual challenges. Despite the well-documented mental health needs for SEAR, most do not present for mental health services. Therefore, resilience and protective factors are discussed. Research and clinical implications are described and suggestions are offered on how to apply information obtained from Southeast Asian refugees' experiences to future refugees.

KW - Cultural issues

KW - Mental health

KW - Protective factors

KW - Refugees

KW - Southeast Asian

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1842714347&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1842714347&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cpr.2003.10.003

DO - 10.1016/j.cpr.2003.10.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 15081516

AN - SCOPUS:1842714347

VL - 24

SP - 193

EP - 213

JO - Clinical Psychology Review

JF - Clinical Psychology Review

SN - 0272-7358

IS - 2

ER -