Undernutrition and associated risk factors among school age children in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Global health

Dawit Degarege, Abraham Degarege, Abebe Animut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Causes of child undernutrition are diverse and change in space and time. Investigating current determinants of undernutrition remains vital to design an effective intervention strategy. The study assessed prevalence of undernutrition and its associated factors among children living in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in 459 school age children and their parents or caregivers living in Lideta sub-city, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Participants were selected using a multi-stage simple random sampling technique. Height and weight of children was measured and their parents or care givers were interviewed for factors associated with undernutrition. Results: About 31% (n∈=∈141) of the children were undernourished (19.6% stunted, 15.9% underweight). Being Male, higher birth order (>2), larger family size (6-8), low meal frequency (≤3 times) in a day prior to the survey and mud floor house were significantly associated with undernutrition. Similarly, the risk of underweight increased significantly with an increase in age, birth order, family size and also the absence of hand washing facilities. The odds of undernutrition was lower in children born to 20-30 years old mothers compared to those born to mothers younger than 20 years. Conclusions: Undernutrition is prevalent among school age children living in Lideta sub city, Addis Ababa. Policy makers should consider school age children in their nutrition policy documents and implement screening program and intervention strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number375
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 12 2015

Fingerprint

Ethiopia
Malnutrition
Birth Order
Thinness
Caregivers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parents
Mothers
Hand Disinfection
Nutrition Policy
Global Health
Administrative Personnel
Meals
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Addis Ababa
  • Children
  • Ethiopia
  • Risk factors
  • Stunting
  • Undernutrition
  • Underweight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Undernutrition and associated risk factors among school age children in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Global health. / Degarege, Dawit; Degarege, Abraham; Animut, Abebe.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 15, No. 1, 375, 12.12.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{02d087c7b30346cbb644bc5dc24fc803,
title = "Undernutrition and associated risk factors among school age children in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Global health",
abstract = "Background: Causes of child undernutrition are diverse and change in space and time. Investigating current determinants of undernutrition remains vital to design an effective intervention strategy. The study assessed prevalence of undernutrition and its associated factors among children living in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in 459 school age children and their parents or caregivers living in Lideta sub-city, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Participants were selected using a multi-stage simple random sampling technique. Height and weight of children was measured and their parents or care givers were interviewed for factors associated with undernutrition. Results: About 31{\%} (n∈=∈141) of the children were undernourished (19.6{\%} stunted, 15.9{\%} underweight). Being Male, higher birth order (>2), larger family size (6-8), low meal frequency (≤3 times) in a day prior to the survey and mud floor house were significantly associated with undernutrition. Similarly, the risk of underweight increased significantly with an increase in age, birth order, family size and also the absence of hand washing facilities. The odds of undernutrition was lower in children born to 20-30 years old mothers compared to those born to mothers younger than 20 years. Conclusions: Undernutrition is prevalent among school age children living in Lideta sub city, Addis Ababa. Policy makers should consider school age children in their nutrition policy documents and implement screening program and intervention strategy.",
keywords = "Addis Ababa, Children, Ethiopia, Risk factors, Stunting, Undernutrition, Underweight",
author = "Dawit Degarege and Abraham Degarege and Abebe Animut",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1186/s12889-015-1714-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
journal = "BMC Public Health",
issn = "1471-2458",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Undernutrition and associated risk factors among school age children in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Global health

AU - Degarege, Dawit

AU - Degarege, Abraham

AU - Animut, Abebe

PY - 2015/12/12

Y1 - 2015/12/12

N2 - Background: Causes of child undernutrition are diverse and change in space and time. Investigating current determinants of undernutrition remains vital to design an effective intervention strategy. The study assessed prevalence of undernutrition and its associated factors among children living in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in 459 school age children and their parents or caregivers living in Lideta sub-city, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Participants were selected using a multi-stage simple random sampling technique. Height and weight of children was measured and their parents or care givers were interviewed for factors associated with undernutrition. Results: About 31% (n∈=∈141) of the children were undernourished (19.6% stunted, 15.9% underweight). Being Male, higher birth order (>2), larger family size (6-8), low meal frequency (≤3 times) in a day prior to the survey and mud floor house were significantly associated with undernutrition. Similarly, the risk of underweight increased significantly with an increase in age, birth order, family size and also the absence of hand washing facilities. The odds of undernutrition was lower in children born to 20-30 years old mothers compared to those born to mothers younger than 20 years. Conclusions: Undernutrition is prevalent among school age children living in Lideta sub city, Addis Ababa. Policy makers should consider school age children in their nutrition policy documents and implement screening program and intervention strategy.

AB - Background: Causes of child undernutrition are diverse and change in space and time. Investigating current determinants of undernutrition remains vital to design an effective intervention strategy. The study assessed prevalence of undernutrition and its associated factors among children living in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in 459 school age children and their parents or caregivers living in Lideta sub-city, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Participants were selected using a multi-stage simple random sampling technique. Height and weight of children was measured and their parents or care givers were interviewed for factors associated with undernutrition. Results: About 31% (n∈=∈141) of the children were undernourished (19.6% stunted, 15.9% underweight). Being Male, higher birth order (>2), larger family size (6-8), low meal frequency (≤3 times) in a day prior to the survey and mud floor house were significantly associated with undernutrition. Similarly, the risk of underweight increased significantly with an increase in age, birth order, family size and also the absence of hand washing facilities. The odds of undernutrition was lower in children born to 20-30 years old mothers compared to those born to mothers younger than 20 years. Conclusions: Undernutrition is prevalent among school age children living in Lideta sub city, Addis Ababa. Policy makers should consider school age children in their nutrition policy documents and implement screening program and intervention strategy.

KW - Addis Ababa

KW - Children

KW - Ethiopia

KW - Risk factors

KW - Stunting

KW - Undernutrition

KW - Underweight

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84928551029&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84928551029&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12889-015-1714-5

DO - 10.1186/s12889-015-1714-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 25879705

AN - SCOPUS:84928551029

VL - 15

JO - BMC Public Health

JF - BMC Public Health

SN - 1471-2458

IS - 1

M1 - 375

ER -