Ultrasound for localization in primary hyperparathyroidism

Russell B. Smith, Maria Evasovich, Douglas A. Girod, Jeffrey B. Jorgensen, William M. Lydiatt, Nitin A. Pagedar, William Spanos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the capability of ultrasound for preoperative localization in primary hyperparathyroidism. Study Design. Prospective study. Setting. Multi-institutional Midwest Head and Neck Cancer Consortium. Subjects and Methods. Two hundred twenty patients who underwent preoperative localization and had parathyroid surgery were evaluated. The findings of preoperative localization studies were correlated with surgical findings. Results. Preoperative ultrasonography, sestamibi scintigraphy, or both were obtained in 77%, 93%, and 69% of the patients, respectively. Preoperative ultrasonography and sestamibi scintigraphy localized an abnormality in 71% and 79% of patients, respectively. At the time of surgery, the localization by ultrasound was accurate in 82%. The accuracy of localization was similar for sestamibi scintigraphy (85%). In patients with inaccurate ultrasound localization, the sestamibi scintigraphy correctly identified the site of disease in only 45%. In patients with a nonlocalizing ultrasound, sestamibi scintigraphy was able to localize disease in only 47%, with 2 being in the mediastinum. Conclusions. Ultrasonography is an acceptable initial localization study for patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. In patients with nonlocalizing ultrasound, sestamibi scintigraphy should be obtained, but can be expected to detect an abnormality in less than 50% of patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)366-371
Number of pages6
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States)
Volume149
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

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Primary Hyperparathyroidism
Radionuclide Imaging
Ultrasonography
Mediastinum
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • hyperparathyroidism
  • localization
  • ultrasonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Smith, R. B., Evasovich, M., Girod, D. A., Jorgensen, J. B., Lydiatt, W. M., Pagedar, N. A., & Spanos, W. (2013). Ultrasound for localization in primary hyperparathyroidism. Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States), 149(3), 366-371. https://doi.org/10.1177/0194599813491063

Ultrasound for localization in primary hyperparathyroidism. / Smith, Russell B.; Evasovich, Maria; Girod, Douglas A.; Jorgensen, Jeffrey B.; Lydiatt, William M.; Pagedar, Nitin A.; Spanos, William.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States), Vol. 149, No. 3, 01.09.2013, p. 366-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, RB, Evasovich, M, Girod, DA, Jorgensen, JB, Lydiatt, WM, Pagedar, NA & Spanos, W 2013, 'Ultrasound for localization in primary hyperparathyroidism', Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States), vol. 149, no. 3, pp. 366-371. https://doi.org/10.1177/0194599813491063
Smith RB, Evasovich M, Girod DA, Jorgensen JB, Lydiatt WM, Pagedar NA et al. Ultrasound for localization in primary hyperparathyroidism. Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States). 2013 Sep 1;149(3):366-371. https://doi.org/10.1177/0194599813491063
Smith, Russell B. ; Evasovich, Maria ; Girod, Douglas A. ; Jorgensen, Jeffrey B. ; Lydiatt, William M. ; Pagedar, Nitin A. ; Spanos, William. / Ultrasound for localization in primary hyperparathyroidism. In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States). 2013 ; Vol. 149, No. 3. pp. 366-371.
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