Trends in health care spending for immigrants in the United States

Jim P. Stimpson, Fernando A. Wilson, Karl Eschbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The suspected burden that undocumented immigrants may place on the U.S. health care system has been a flashpoint in health care and immigration reform debates. An examination of health care spending during 1999-2006 for adult naturalized citizens and immigrant noncitizens (which includes some undocumented immigrants) finds that the cost of providing health care to immigrants is lower than that of providing care to U.S. natives and that immigrants are not contributing disproportionately to high health care costs in public programs such as Medicaid. However, noncitizen immigrants were found to be more likely than U.S. natives to have a health care visit classified as uncompensated care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)544-550
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

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Delivery of Health Care
Population Groups
Health Care Costs
Uncompensated Care
Health Care Reform
Emigration and Immigration
Medicaid
Undocumented Immigrants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Trends in health care spending for immigrants in the United States. / Stimpson, Jim P.; Wilson, Fernando A.; Eschbach, Karl.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.03.2010, p. 544-550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stimpson, Jim P. ; Wilson, Fernando A. ; Eschbach, Karl. / Trends in health care spending for immigrants in the United States. In: Health Affairs. 2010 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 544-550.
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