Trends and socioeconomic differences in policy triggers for thinking about quitting smoking: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys

Karin Hummel, Gera E. Nagelhout, Marc C. Willemsen, Pete Driezen, Linda Springvloet, Ute Mons, Anton E. Kunst, Romain Guignard, Shane Allwright, Bas van den Putte, Ciska Hoving, Geoffrey T. Fong, Ann McNeill, Mohammad Siahpush, Hein de Vries

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of the current study is to investigate trends and socioeconomic differences in policy triggers for thinking about quitting in six European countries. Methods: Data were derived from all available survey waves of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys (2003-2013). France conducted three survey waves (n= 1420-1735), Germany three waves ( n= 515-1515), The Netherlands seven waves ( n= 1420-1668), Ireland three waves ( n= 582-1071), Scotland two waves ( n= 461-507), and the rest of the United Kingdom conducted seven survey waves ( n= 861-1737). Smokers were asked whether four different policies (cigarette price, smoking restrictions in public places, free or lower cost medication, and warning labels on cigarette packs) influenced them to think about quitting. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) models were estimated for each country. Results: Cigarette price was mentioned most often in all countries and across all waves as trigger for thinking about quitting. Mentioning cigarette price and warning labels increased after the implementation of price increases and warning labels in some countries, while mentioning smoking restrictions decreased after their implementation in four countries. All studied policy triggers were mentioned more often by smokers with low and/or moderate education and income than smokers with high education and income. The education and income differences did not change significantly over time for most policies and in most countries. Conclusions: Tobacco control policies work as a trigger to increase thoughts about quitting, particularly in smokers with low education and low income and therefore have the potential to reduce health inequalities in smoking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5706
Pages (from-to)154-162
Number of pages9
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume155
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Fingerprint

Tobacco
Smoking
Tobacco Products
Education
Labels
Scotland
Ireland
Netherlands
France
Germany
Surveys and Questionnaires
Thinking
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health

Keywords

  • Cessation
  • Public policy
  • Socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Trends and socioeconomic differences in policy triggers for thinking about quitting smoking : Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys. / Hummel, Karin; Nagelhout, Gera E.; Willemsen, Marc C.; Driezen, Pete; Springvloet, Linda; Mons, Ute; Kunst, Anton E.; Guignard, Romain; Allwright, Shane; van den Putte, Bas; Hoving, Ciska; Fong, Geoffrey T.; McNeill, Ann; Siahpush, Mohammad; Vries, Hein de.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 155, 5706, 01.10.2015, p. 154-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hummel, K, Nagelhout, GE, Willemsen, MC, Driezen, P, Springvloet, L, Mons, U, Kunst, AE, Guignard, R, Allwright, S, van den Putte, B, Hoving, C, Fong, GT, McNeill, A, Siahpush, M & Vries, HD 2015, 'Trends and socioeconomic differences in policy triggers for thinking about quitting smoking: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 155, 5706, pp. 154-162. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.07.678
Hummel, Karin ; Nagelhout, Gera E. ; Willemsen, Marc C. ; Driezen, Pete ; Springvloet, Linda ; Mons, Ute ; Kunst, Anton E. ; Guignard, Romain ; Allwright, Shane ; van den Putte, Bas ; Hoving, Ciska ; Fong, Geoffrey T. ; McNeill, Ann ; Siahpush, Mohammad ; Vries, Hein de. / Trends and socioeconomic differences in policy triggers for thinking about quitting smoking : Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2015 ; Vol. 155. pp. 154-162.
@article{a6ab61f4763749b9a38261c2510f0d93,
title = "Trends and socioeconomic differences in policy triggers for thinking about quitting smoking: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys",
abstract = "Introduction: The aim of the current study is to investigate trends and socioeconomic differences in policy triggers for thinking about quitting in six European countries. Methods: Data were derived from all available survey waves of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys (2003-2013). France conducted three survey waves (n= 1420-1735), Germany three waves ( n= 515-1515), The Netherlands seven waves ( n= 1420-1668), Ireland three waves ( n= 582-1071), Scotland two waves ( n= 461-507), and the rest of the United Kingdom conducted seven survey waves ( n= 861-1737). Smokers were asked whether four different policies (cigarette price, smoking restrictions in public places, free or lower cost medication, and warning labels on cigarette packs) influenced them to think about quitting. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) models were estimated for each country. Results: Cigarette price was mentioned most often in all countries and across all waves as trigger for thinking about quitting. Mentioning cigarette price and warning labels increased after the implementation of price increases and warning labels in some countries, while mentioning smoking restrictions decreased after their implementation in four countries. All studied policy triggers were mentioned more often by smokers with low and/or moderate education and income than smokers with high education and income. The education and income differences did not change significantly over time for most policies and in most countries. Conclusions: Tobacco control policies work as a trigger to increase thoughts about quitting, particularly in smokers with low education and low income and therefore have the potential to reduce health inequalities in smoking.",
keywords = "Cessation, Public policy, Socioeconomic status",
author = "Karin Hummel and Nagelhout, {Gera E.} and Willemsen, {Marc C.} and Pete Driezen and Linda Springvloet and Ute Mons and Kunst, {Anton E.} and Romain Guignard and Shane Allwright and {van den Putte}, Bas and Ciska Hoving and Fong, {Geoffrey T.} and Ann McNeill and Mohammad Siahpush and Vries, {Hein de}",
year = "2015",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.07.678",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "155",
pages = "154--162",
journal = "Drug and Alcohol Dependence",
issn = "0376-8716",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trends and socioeconomic differences in policy triggers for thinking about quitting smoking

T2 - Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys

AU - Hummel, Karin

AU - Nagelhout, Gera E.

AU - Willemsen, Marc C.

AU - Driezen, Pete

AU - Springvloet, Linda

AU - Mons, Ute

AU - Kunst, Anton E.

AU - Guignard, Romain

AU - Allwright, Shane

AU - van den Putte, Bas

AU - Hoving, Ciska

AU - Fong, Geoffrey T.

AU - McNeill, Ann

AU - Siahpush, Mohammad

AU - Vries, Hein de

PY - 2015/10/1

Y1 - 2015/10/1

N2 - Introduction: The aim of the current study is to investigate trends and socioeconomic differences in policy triggers for thinking about quitting in six European countries. Methods: Data were derived from all available survey waves of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys (2003-2013). France conducted three survey waves (n= 1420-1735), Germany three waves ( n= 515-1515), The Netherlands seven waves ( n= 1420-1668), Ireland three waves ( n= 582-1071), Scotland two waves ( n= 461-507), and the rest of the United Kingdom conducted seven survey waves ( n= 861-1737). Smokers were asked whether four different policies (cigarette price, smoking restrictions in public places, free or lower cost medication, and warning labels on cigarette packs) influenced them to think about quitting. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) models were estimated for each country. Results: Cigarette price was mentioned most often in all countries and across all waves as trigger for thinking about quitting. Mentioning cigarette price and warning labels increased after the implementation of price increases and warning labels in some countries, while mentioning smoking restrictions decreased after their implementation in four countries. All studied policy triggers were mentioned more often by smokers with low and/or moderate education and income than smokers with high education and income. The education and income differences did not change significantly over time for most policies and in most countries. Conclusions: Tobacco control policies work as a trigger to increase thoughts about quitting, particularly in smokers with low education and low income and therefore have the potential to reduce health inequalities in smoking.

AB - Introduction: The aim of the current study is to investigate trends and socioeconomic differences in policy triggers for thinking about quitting in six European countries. Methods: Data were derived from all available survey waves of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys (2003-2013). France conducted three survey waves (n= 1420-1735), Germany three waves ( n= 515-1515), The Netherlands seven waves ( n= 1420-1668), Ireland three waves ( n= 582-1071), Scotland two waves ( n= 461-507), and the rest of the United Kingdom conducted seven survey waves ( n= 861-1737). Smokers were asked whether four different policies (cigarette price, smoking restrictions in public places, free or lower cost medication, and warning labels on cigarette packs) influenced them to think about quitting. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) models were estimated for each country. Results: Cigarette price was mentioned most often in all countries and across all waves as trigger for thinking about quitting. Mentioning cigarette price and warning labels increased after the implementation of price increases and warning labels in some countries, while mentioning smoking restrictions decreased after their implementation in four countries. All studied policy triggers were mentioned more often by smokers with low and/or moderate education and income than smokers with high education and income. The education and income differences did not change significantly over time for most policies and in most countries. Conclusions: Tobacco control policies work as a trigger to increase thoughts about quitting, particularly in smokers with low education and low income and therefore have the potential to reduce health inequalities in smoking.

KW - Cessation

KW - Public policy

KW - Socioeconomic status

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84941937071&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84941937071&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.07.678

DO - 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.07.678

M3 - Article

C2 - 26282108

AN - SCOPUS:84941937071

VL - 155

SP - 154

EP - 162

JO - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

JF - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

SN - 0376-8716

M1 - 5706

ER -