Treatment of Hairy-Cell Leukemia with Chemoradiotherapy and Identical-Twin Bone-Marrow Transplantation

M. A. Cheever, A. Fefer, P. D. Greenberg, F. Appelbaum, James Olen Armitage, C. D. Buckner, G. E. Sale, R. Storb, R. P. Witherspoon, E. D. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

HAIRY-CELL leukemia (leukemic reticuloendotheliosis) is a disorder in which mononuclear leukocytes with characteristic filamentous cytoplasmic villae (“hairy” cells) accumulate in peripheral blood, spleen, and bone marrow. The typical presentation includes pancytopenia and splenomegaly, with hairy cells in the peripheral blood.1 2 3 4 5 The major clinical problem is infection attributable to defects in host defense,6 7 8 9 including either granulocytopenia7 or monocytopenia6,8 with impairment of normal monocyte function8,9 or both. The clinical course is variable but usually progressive and fatal, with a median survival time of four to six years after diagnosis.1 2 3 4 5 There is no known cure for hairy-cell leukemia. Although splenectomy10 and leukapheresis11 often.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-481
Number of pages3
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume307
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 19 1982

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Hairy Cell Leukemia
Monozygotic Twins
Chemoradiotherapy
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Mononuclear Leukocytes
Pancytopenia
Splenomegaly
Monocytes
Leukemia
Spleen
Bone Marrow
Therapeutics
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Treatment of Hairy-Cell Leukemia with Chemoradiotherapy and Identical-Twin Bone-Marrow Transplantation. / Cheever, M. A.; Fefer, A.; Greenberg, P. D.; Appelbaum, F.; Armitage, James Olen; Buckner, C. D.; Sale, G. E.; Storb, R.; Witherspoon, R. P.; Thomas, E. D.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 307, No. 8, 19.08.1982, p. 479-481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheever, MA, Fefer, A, Greenberg, PD, Appelbaum, F, Armitage, JO, Buckner, CD, Sale, GE, Storb, R, Witherspoon, RP & Thomas, ED 1982, 'Treatment of Hairy-Cell Leukemia with Chemoradiotherapy and Identical-Twin Bone-Marrow Transplantation', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 307, no. 8, pp. 479-481. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM198208193070805
Cheever, M. A. ; Fefer, A. ; Greenberg, P. D. ; Appelbaum, F. ; Armitage, James Olen ; Buckner, C. D. ; Sale, G. E. ; Storb, R. ; Witherspoon, R. P. ; Thomas, E. D. / Treatment of Hairy-Cell Leukemia with Chemoradiotherapy and Identical-Twin Bone-Marrow Transplantation. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1982 ; Vol. 307, No. 8. pp. 479-481.
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AU - Armitage, James Olen

AU - Buckner, C. D.

AU - Sale, G. E.

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