Treatment for non-hodgkin's lymphoma in relapse – what are the alternatives?

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multiagent chemotherapy including anthracyclines can induce long-term disease-free survival in 40 to 45 percent of patients with intermediate-grade, aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The other 55 to 60 percent of patients either do not have complete remission or have relapses, necessitating further treatment.1 In this issue of the Journal, Philip et al.2 describe the Parma study, in which patients with relapses of chemotherapy-sensitive, aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were randomly assigned to receive either conventional salvage chemotherapy or high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation. After a median follow-up of 63 months, the event-free survival among patients in the conventional-treatment group was 12 percent,.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1565-1566
Number of pages2
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume333
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 7 1995

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Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Disease-Free Survival
Autologous Transplantation
Anthracyclines
Therapeutics
Bone Marrow Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Treatment for non-hodgkin's lymphoma in relapse – what are the alternatives? / Vose, Julie Marie.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 333, No. 23, 07.12.1995, p. 1565-1566.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

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abstract = "Multiagent chemotherapy including anthracyclines can induce long-term disease-free survival in 40 to 45 percent of patients with intermediate-grade, aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The other 55 to 60 percent of patients either do not have complete remission or have relapses, necessitating further treatment.1 In this issue of the Journal, Philip et al.2 describe the Parma study, in which patients with relapses of chemotherapy-sensitive, aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were randomly assigned to receive either conventional salvage chemotherapy or high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation. After a median follow-up of 63 months, the event-free survival among patients in the conventional-treatment group was 12 percent,.",
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