Transcription factor FOXO3a mediates apoptosis in HIV-1-infected macrophages

Min Cui, Yunlong Huang, Yong Zhao, Jialin C Zheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Macrophages serve as a major reservoir for HIV-1 because a large number of macrophages in the brain and lung are infected with HIV-1 during late stage disease. Recent evidence suggests that those HIV-1-infected macrophages play a key role in contributing to tissue damage in AIDS pathogenesis. Macrophages undergo apoptosis upon HIV-1 infection; however, the mechanisms of this process are not well-defined. Previously, we demonstrated that HIV-1 infection inhibits Akt-1, a critical protein for cell survival of macrophages. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of transcription factor FOXO3a in the regulation of HIV-1-mediated apoptosis in macrophages. HIV-1 infection significantly decreased phosphorylation of FOXO3a and promoted FOXO3a translocation to the nucleus in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Overexpression of a constitutively active FOXO3a increased DNA fragmentation with decreased cell viability in MDM, whereas a dominant-negative mutant of FOXO3a or small interfering RNA for FOXO3a to knockdown the function of FOXO3a in HIV-1-infected MDM decreased DNA fragmentation and protected macrophages from death in HIV-1-infected MDM. Overexpression of constitutively active Akt-1 increased FOXO3a phosphorylation, suggesting that FOXO3a phosphorylation in human MDM is dependent on Akt-1. We therefore conclude that FOXO3a plays an important role in HIV-1-induced cell death of human macrophage. Understanding the PI3K/Akt-1/FOXO3a pathway and its associated death mechanism in macrophages during HIV-1 infection would lead to identification of potential therapeutic avenues for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)898-906
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume180
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2008

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HIV-1
Transcription Factors
Macrophages
Apoptosis
HIV Infections
Phosphorylation
DNA Fragmentation
Cell Survival
Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases
Small Interfering RNA
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Cell Death
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Transcription factor FOXO3a mediates apoptosis in HIV-1-infected macrophages. / Cui, Min; Huang, Yunlong; Zhao, Yong; Zheng, Jialin C.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 180, No. 2, 15.01.2008, p. 898-906.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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