Toxoplasma on the brain: Understanding host-pathogen interactions in chronic CNS infection

Sushrut Kamerkar, Paul H. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii is a prevalent obligate intracellular parasite which chronically infects more than a third of the world's population. Key to parasite prevalence is its ability to form chronic and nonimmunogenic bradyzoite cysts, which typically form in the brain and muscle cells of infected mammals, including humans. While acute clinical infection typically involves neurological and/or ocular damage, chronic infection has been more recently linked to behavioral changes. Establishment and maintenance of chronic infection involves a balance between the host immunity and parasite evasion of the immune response. Here, we outline the known cellular interplay between Toxoplasma gondii and cells of the central nervous system and review the reported effects of Toxoplasma gondii on behavior and neurological disease. Finally, we review new technologies which will allow us to more fully understand host-pathogen interactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number589295
JournalJournal of Parasitology Research
Volume2012
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 19 2012

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Host-Pathogen Interactions
Toxoplasma
Parasites
Brain
Infection
Immune Evasion
Aptitude
Muscle Cells
Cysts
Mammals
Immunity
Central Nervous System
Maintenance
Technology
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Toxoplasma on the brain : Understanding host-pathogen interactions in chronic CNS infection. / Kamerkar, Sushrut; Davis, Paul H.

In: Journal of Parasitology Research, Vol. 2012, 589295, 19.04.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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