Toward in vivo mobility

Mark E. Rentschler, Jason Dumpert, Stephen R. Platt, Shane M Farritor, Dmitry Oleynikov

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Today's laparoscopic tools impose severe ergonomic limitations and are constrained to only four degrees of freedom. These constraints limit the surgeon's ability to orient the tool tips arbitrarily, and can contribute to a variety of complications. Robots external to the patient have been used to aid in the manipulation of the tools and improve dexterity. However, these robots are expensive, bulky, and are used for only select procedures. In vivo robotic assistants have the potential to enhance the capabilities of the surgeon, reduce costs, and reduce patient trauma. The motion of these in vivo robots will not be constrained by the insertion incisions. Such assistants will need to attain optimal viewing angles by traversing the abdominal organs without causing trauma. This paper presents an experimental analysis of miniature in vivo robot wheels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedicine Meets Virtual Reality 13
Subtitle of host publicationThe Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005
PublisherIOS Press
Pages397-403
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)1586034987, 9781586034986
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Event13th Annual Conference on Medicine Meets Virtual Reality: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005 - Long Beach, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 26 2005Jan 29 2005

Publication series

NameStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Volume111
ISSN (Print)0926-9630
ISSN (Electronic)1879-8365

Conference

Conference13th Annual Conference on Medicine Meets Virtual Reality: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005
CountryUnited States
CityLong Beach, CA
Period1/26/051/29/05

Fingerprint

Robots
Aptitude
Human Engineering
Wounds and Injuries
Robotics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Ergonomics
Wheels
Surgeons
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Rentschler, M. E., Dumpert, J., Platt, S. R., Farritor, S. M., & Oleynikov, D. (2005). Toward in vivo mobility. In Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 13: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005 (pp. 397-403). (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics; Vol. 111). IOS Press.

Toward in vivo mobility. / Rentschler, Mark E.; Dumpert, Jason; Platt, Stephen R.; Farritor, Shane M; Oleynikov, Dmitry.

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 13: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005. IOS Press, 2005. p. 397-403 (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics; Vol. 111).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Rentschler, ME, Dumpert, J, Platt, SR, Farritor, SM & Oleynikov, D 2005, Toward in vivo mobility. in Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 13: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, vol. 111, IOS Press, pp. 397-403, 13th Annual Conference on Medicine Meets Virtual Reality: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005, Long Beach, CA, United States, 1/26/05.
Rentschler ME, Dumpert J, Platt SR, Farritor SM, Oleynikov D. Toward in vivo mobility. In Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 13: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005. IOS Press. 2005. p. 397-403. (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics).
Rentschler, Mark E. ; Dumpert, Jason ; Platt, Stephen R. ; Farritor, Shane M ; Oleynikov, Dmitry. / Toward in vivo mobility. Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 13: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005. IOS Press, 2005. pp. 397-403 (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics).
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