Total indoor smoking ban and smoker behavior

David M. Daughton, Charles E. Andrews, Charles P. Orona, Kashinath D. Patil, Stephen Israel Rennard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methods. To assess smoking policy support and effects, 1,083 hospital employees (203 smokers) were surveyed by anonymous questionnaire 1 year after the announcement (5 months after implementation) of a new total indoor smoking ban. A second follow-up, limited to smoker respondents only, was conducted 2 years postannouncement. Results. A total indoor smoking ban was supported by the vast majority of nonsmokers (89%) and ex-smokers (86%) and by nearly half of the then-smoking population (45%). Consistent with previous reports, the smoking ban was associated with a significant decrease in cigarette use during work hours, particularly among moderate to heavy smokers. However, the ban did not result in increased institutional quit rates. Light smokers (<10 cig/day), compared with heavy smokers (≥30 cig/day), were more likely to support the no-smoking policy and had fewer problems observing the ban. They were also less apt to report a decrease in work productivity. Conclusion. A total indoor smoking ban had little effect on overall institutional quit rates. Heavy smokers will, predictably, experience the greatest difficulty complying with a total indoor nonsmoking policy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)670-676
Number of pages7
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Smoking
Tobacco Products
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Daughton, D. M., Andrews, C. E., Orona, C. P., Patil, K. D., & Rennard, S. I. (1992). Total indoor smoking ban and smoker behavior. Preventive Medicine, 21(5), 670-676. https://doi.org/10.1016/0091-7435(92)90073-Q

Total indoor smoking ban and smoker behavior. / Daughton, David M.; Andrews, Charles E.; Orona, Charles P.; Patil, Kashinath D.; Rennard, Stephen Israel.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 5, 01.01.1992, p. 670-676.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Daughton, DM, Andrews, CE, Orona, CP, Patil, KD & Rennard, SI 1992, 'Total indoor smoking ban and smoker behavior', Preventive Medicine, vol. 21, no. 5, pp. 670-676. https://doi.org/10.1016/0091-7435(92)90073-Q
Daughton DM, Andrews CE, Orona CP, Patil KD, Rennard SI. Total indoor smoking ban and smoker behavior. Preventive Medicine. 1992 Jan 1;21(5):670-676. https://doi.org/10.1016/0091-7435(92)90073-Q
Daughton, David M. ; Andrews, Charles E. ; Orona, Charles P. ; Patil, Kashinath D. ; Rennard, Stephen Israel. / Total indoor smoking ban and smoker behavior. In: Preventive Medicine. 1992 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 670-676.
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